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Walnut/Maple Hallway Table


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3 hours ago, Kev said:

They look great!  I typically slow the bit down a bit and make several passes for large round overs like this.

Table is looking great!

Thanks!! 
 

yes it was a good thing I randomly read all the labels on the bit case and noticed they called out a slower speed. So I slowed it down … it said 16k max. So I ran with that. Gave a super nice finish though! 

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You could have made a quick couple of clamping blocks to help.  Forstner bit to match your radius..

I do this from time to time but, I'm not sure I've ever put it on film.

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1 hour ago, Kev said:

You could have made a quick couple of clamping blocks to help.  Forstner bit to match your radius..

I do this from time to time but, I'm not sure I've ever put it on film.

gonna have to look into this next time I do this ... 

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12 hours ago, Coop said:

I gotta ask, why didn’t you do the inlay “racing stripes” before the rabbet for the glass? 

 

10 hours ago, Woodenskye (Bryan) said:

I would assume it was because the change in grain direction could create an issue with tear out. I’m sure Drew will answer with his reasoning.

 

9 hours ago, Coop said:

I’m assuming that it is a rabbet and not two separate pieces, laminated together? 


 

haha. Honestly I wish I had a cool story on why … it’s because I suck at progression and didn’t even thing of how much easier this would be with putting them in first and then working on rabbet. I got so single sighted about how to get the rabbet in there nicely it didn’t even cross my mind that doing that first would make this next part really suuuuuuck. 

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This project just keeps kicking my butt haha. 
 

Installed the figure 8s and then realized  I would screw through the rabbeted top since the legs stick in further than the sides. I guess the only good thing about it is that I caught it before I did it. 
 

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so now I am thinking Z clips? Don’t have any here to test so need to buy some. I have about 1/2” of space on the sides to install them without going through the thinner part. 
 

also still need to round over the edges to match… 

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1 hour ago, Bushwacked said:

so now I am thinking Z clips? Don’t have any here to test so need to buy some. I have about 1/2” of space on the sides to install them without going through the thinner part. 

 

You might consider one screw centered on each side rail from the bottom into the frame.  A centered screw won't restrict wood movement and still secure the top in place.

1 hour ago, Bushwacked said:

No, I used a rattle can with good success..  Like this ..

https://www.amazon.com/Krylon-I00810-Glass-Frosting-Aerosol/dp/B001CEQ39U/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1NF2U5MHK5KAM&dchild=1&keywords=spray+window+frost&qid=1629397875&sprefix=Spray+window+%2Caps%2C360&sr=8-5

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2 hours ago, Bushwacked said:

Installed the figure 8s and then realized  I would screw through the rabbeted top since the legs stick in further than the sides. I guess the only good thing about it is that I caught it before I did it.

No harm, no foul.  I would probably use dowels, centered, one on each leg.  The dowels will locate and keep the top from moving side to side, and the weight of the glass top will keep the top tight to the legs.  The other advantage it will allow the top to be easily removed in case you have to move the table.   

+1 on the rattle can frosting @Kev linked.  I have used it on several glass door projects.  

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Kev said:

You might consider one screw centered on each side rail from the bottom into the frame.  A centered screw won't restrict wood movement and still secure the top in place.

No, I used a rattle can with good success..  Like this ..

https://www.amazon.com/Krylon-I00810-Glass-Frosting-Aerosol/dp/B001CEQ39U/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1NF2U5MHK5KAM&dchild=1&keywords=spray+window+frost&qid=1629397875&sprefix=Spray+window+%2Caps%2C360&sr=8-5

so just some like 3" screws or so, I believe, would be the length to attach it? so just the 2 screws in the sides ... would let wood move enough and hold it if picked up by the top?

Thanks I will take a look at that and see 

2 hours ago, Bob said:

No harm, no foul.  I would probably use dowels, centered, one on each leg.  The dowels will locate and keep the top from moving side to side, and the weight of the glass top will keep the top tight to the legs.  The other advantage it will allow the top to be easily removed in case you have to move the table.   

+1 on the rattle can frosting @Kev linked.  I have used it on several glass door projects.  

Interesting on the dowel idea ... assuming the dowels would still let the top wood move? Even if they were glued in?

Edited by Bushwacked
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12 minutes ago, Bushwacked said:

so just some like 3" screws or so, I believe, would be the length to attach it?

Thanks I will take a look at that and see 

Yep..  Long enough to attach the top without popping through

13 minutes ago, Bushwacked said:

Interesting on the dowel idea ... assuming the dowels would still let the top wood move? Even if they were glued in?

No glue and they would need to be undersized slightly on one side with this method.  Or, you could glue in one long side dowels and leave the other side undersized and unglued.

There's a down side to either what I suggested or what Bryan suggested.  Any warping of the table with seasonal movement could show a gap off of the rails.  This could be compounded is there was no weight on the table.

Looking back at your original picture, is there any reason you can't use the figure 8s installed on the side rails?  That's actually how I usually do it with 2 per side. This allows for movement and good hold down force.  

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28 minutes ago, Bushwacked said:

Interesting on the dowel idea ... assuming the dowels would still let the top wood move? Even if they were glued in?

Glue the dowel into the leg.  No glue for the top just a hole to fit over the dowel.  I don't know where you live, but I am not sure I would worry to much about movement in your top frame.  It is essentially a raised panel frame without the panel.  When building a  raised panel door etc... the wood movement concerns come from the wood panel and not the frame.  But you can just make the holes for the dowel slightly larger than the dowel to allow for movement.  

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10 minutes ago, Kev said:

Yep..  Long enough to attach the top without popping through

No glue and they would need to be undersized slightly on one side with this method.  Or, you could glue in one long side dowels and leave the other side undersized and unglued.

There's a down side to either what I suggested or what Bryan suggested.  Any warping of the table with seasonal movement could show a gap off of the rails.  This could be compounded is there was no weight on the table.

Looking back at your original picture, is there any reason you can't use the figure 8s installed on the side rails?  That's actually how I usually do it with 2 per side. This allows for movement and good hold down force.  

gotcha .. thanks for the info

As far as the figure 8's on the side ... I just assumed they were too big to fit, but I didnt look as I was frustrated with the other part and had to go pick up kids from school. I just went to check and they did fit so I installed them.

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18 minutes ago, Bob said:

Glue the dowel into the leg.  No glue for the top just a hole to fit over the dowel.  I don't know where you live, but I am not sure I would worry to much about movement in your top frame.  It is essentially a raised panel frame without the panel.  When building a  raised panel door etc... the wood movement concerns come from the wood panel and not the frame.  But you can just make the holes for the dowel slightly larger than the dowel to allow for movement.  

I will definitely try this out on a future build ... got my issue worked out for now

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3 hours ago, Bushwacked said:

gotcha .. thanks for the info

As far as the figure 8's on the side ... I just assumed they were too big to fit, but I didnt look as I was frustrated with the other part and had to go pick up kids from school. I just went to check and they did fit so I installed them.

Assuming your rails are 3/4" (or close to it) they should fit fine.

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