Jump to content
Title of the document

Undercut Bevel on a Round Piece


Chet
 Share

Recommended Posts

I want to do an under cut bevel on a round piece of wood.  Has anyone had experience with doing this and if so how did you go about it. 

The piece is 1 1/4" thick and 11 1/2" in diameter.

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Chet said:

I want to do an under cut bevel on a round piece of wood.  Has anyone had experience with doing this and if so how did you go about it. 

The piece is 1 1/4" thick and 11 1/2" in diameter.

Interesting situation!  Any pictures?

Obviously, I think a jig is in order..lol.   I think I would start with a "cradle" for the round object to lock it in place and then a top guide to put the track saw on.  

Or, are you trying to bevel the round into a wedge?  If that's the case, then a planer sled should do the trick..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was planning on cutting the circle on my band saw with the circle cutting jig and then I wanted to bevel the bottom edge of the circle.

Its going to end up as a stool seat.

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Chet said:

I was planning on cutting the circle on my band saw with the circle cutting jig and then I wanted to bevel the bottom edge of the circle.

Its going to end up as a stool seat.

Ok..  I think the planer sled is the way to go..  Just shim it up and lock it in place where you want it and start making passes until you reach the desired shape..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess it would depend on how wide you want the bevel to be, but would a 45* bevel bit in a router table work?   This round is only 3/4 thick and the bit is my largest bevel.  Just a WAG.

DSC_0052.JPG.c3d8fb724f04381478e4e1517182e061.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Bob said:

I guess it would depend on how wide you want the bevel to be, but would a 45* bevel bit in a router table work?   This round is only 3/4 thick and the bit is my largest bevel.  Just a WAG.

DSC_0052.JPG.c3d8fb724f04381478e4e1517182e061.JPG

This is what I was thinking of trying.  I was thinking of doing it in a few passes, raising the bit a little at a time.

Bob when you did this, did you use a pivot pin in you router table.

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Chet said:

This is what I was thinking of trying.  I was thinking of doing it in a few passes, raising the bit a little at a time.

Bob when you did this, did you use a pivot pin in you router table.

Ah, ok, now I understand....lol

Yes, light cuts!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Chet said:

This is what I was thinking of trying.  I was thinking of doing it in a few passes, raising the bit a little at a time.

Bob when you did this, did you use a pivot pin in you router table.

I didn't do it.  I was thinking about your question and happened to have a large round in my scrap.  I set that up to see if it might work.  I would not cut it by raising the bit.  I would set the bit to final height and bring the fence forward and take multiple passed gradually moving the fence back.  Seems to me changing the bearing height with each pass might cause problems.  But I am just guessing.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Bob said:

I didn't do it.  I was thinking about your question and happened to have a large round in my scrap.  I set that up to see if it might work.  I would not cut it by raising the bit.  I would set the bit to final height and bring the fence forward and take multiple passed gradually moving the fence back.  Seems to me changing the bearing height with each pass might cause problems.  But I am just guessing.  

I do round over's on my Lazy Susans and raise the bit making multiple passes. Same process for a chamfer.  @Bob  is correct though, you have to watch what the bearing is riding on.

I've done them with a pivot pin and with the fence and I prefer the fence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Coop said:

Another one of my safety slacker qualities as I never use a pivot pin. I guess there are times when it’s a good idea?

Anytime I'm free feeding into a bit, I use a pin..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Coop said:

I guess there are times when it’s a good idea?

One of these days you will have a router table experience that will make say, right after you change you diaper, OH, thats why they use the pin.🤣

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Chet said:

One of these days you will have a router table experience that will make say, right after you change you diaper, OH, thats why they use the pin.🤣

Agreed!  I remember having the Big Daddy bit in the router table (even with a pin) and feeding one of the Maloof Rocker rear legs across it and it grabbed.  Flung that entire leg across the shop...lol. To this day, that bit still scares the hell out of me!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...