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Shop Safety


Kev
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Looking back through my video library (there's a few!) and I realized that I'd never really done a shop safety video.  So, I guess it's time!  I'm thinking somewhere around year end wrap up video type of thing..

I've spent a little time working through my "top 10" list and would love some input from you guys.  Obviously, I need to touch on the obvious but, I'd like to reach outside the box as well..  So, here's my list and all input is welcome!

  1. Dust collection at the source
  2. Respirators
  3. Hearing Protection
  4. Eye protection
  5. Mind on task - Tired/Distracted - Taking a shortcut?
  6. First Aid Kit - Sometimes your phone is your best kit!
  7. Fire Extinguisher
  8. Oily rag disposal
  9. Push Sticks - Birdsmouth push sticks are dangerous! - Body Position and Riving Knife - Why is my blade guard removed.
  10. Batteries not left in chargers

There will be some Amazon links for some products I suggest and all that good stuff but, I want to make sure I'm not missing anything important..  I have no issues expanding this to a top 15 list..

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Probably asking to go to time out but I don’t us a blade guard or riving knife on the ts. On the riving knife, I took it off due to using both thin and full kerf blades. On a couple of occasions over the last few years I have stop the saw during a rip cut and place a shim between the two pieces at the end of the board being ripped. 

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4 minutes ago, Coop said:

Probably asking to go to time out but I don’t us a blade guard or riving knife on the ts. On the riving knife, I took it off due to using both thin and full kerf blades. On a couple of occasions over the last few years I have stop the saw during a rip cut and place a shim between the two pieces at the end of the board being ripped. 

Although I think the riving knife is very important, most saws today have them and people use them.  I'll probably touch on this in the push stick segment as it is important..

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1 minute ago, Coop said:

Along the same note, is a higher powered ts more likely to have a kick back while ripping a wonky board than a lower hp ts? My thought is yes. 

I don't think that's stated quite right...  The lower HP TS might be easier to control a kickback because it's underpowered..  I'd rather have a riving knife, proper breakdown techniques, and proper practices at the TS to avoid the kickbacks.. 😉

 

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You are absolutely correct. Just another one of my justifications for not using one. My ts also came with a blade guard which I chose not to use. Two strikes already. At least I have a first aid kit and fire extinguisher. 😀

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5 minutes ago, Coop said:

You are absolutely correct. Just another one of my justifications for not using one. My ts also came with a blade guard which I chose not to use. Two strikes already. At least I have a first aid kit and fire extinguisher. 😀

We were going to have a conversation if you didn't have a fire extinguisher.....lol

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7 hours ago, Coop said:

Probably asking to go to time out but I don’t us a blade guard or riving knife on the ts. On the riving knife, I took it off due to using both thin and full kerf blades. On a couple of occasions over the last few years I have stop the saw during a rip cut and place a shim between the two pieces at the end of the board being ripped. 

I’d kill to have a riving knife! It’s more of a mental safety feature for me. With my pm I put in the aftermarket splitter system in the insert plate. I was scared to death of my saw before I had it in, now it’s an extra sense of security. I know it has prevented kickbacks with it in. 

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13 hours ago, Coop said:

On the riving knife, I took it off due to using both thin and full kerf blades. 

Sorry Coop, butI think that the riving knife is such an important safety devise that one should just make a commitment to thin or regular kerf as apposed to going with out. 

Last summer I did a project with my grand daughter and I am just about done doing a project with my other grand daughter.  One of the things in teaching them is doing sort of a dry run with the power off.  Going through the initial process of pushing the the piece of the project toward the blade while thinking about were their body is placed, what would happen if anything shifted or slipped.  I think this is a good practice, even for a grizzled veteran of the hobby, especially when you are doing an unusual cut or using a jig or fixture, and more so if it is the first time for the jig.  Neither of them were allowed to use the jointer but at every other tool we would go through this process.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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50 minutes ago, Chet said:

Sorry Coop, butI think that the riving knife is such an important safety devise that one should just make a commitment to thin or regular kerf as apposed to going with out. 

Last summer I did a project with my grand daughter and I am just about done doing a project with my other grand daughter.  One of the things in teaching them is doing sort of a dry run with the power off.  Going through the initial process of pushing the the piece of the project toward the blade while thinking about were their body is placed, what would happen if anything shifted or slipped.  I think this is a good practice, even for a grizzled veteran of the hobby, especially when you are doing an unusual cut or using a jig or fixture, and more so if it is the first time for the jig.  Neither of them were allowed to use the jointer but at every other tool we would go through this process.

Great advice and teaching!

I am curious about keeping them from the jointer?  I would think this a much safer tool than the table saw.

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With every tool, I have shown them what it does, how it works and added that if they weren't comfortable using it I would do that step for them.  The younger one last summer didn't want to use the jointer or router table.  This time around the older one has only stepped back from the jointer, she's  used everything else.  Neither has used the miter saw just because it just isn't in my work flow much anymore.

This teaching process has been different then what would have happened in school shop environment, in that neither one of them had prior experience.  In school there would have been a build up in tool use starting with mostly hand tools and progressing from there.

In this teaching process I have learned as much as I have taught.  It really changes how you look at things along with remembering that the details that are second nature to you, they are totally unaware of.   I am having the time of my life and wouldn't give up this opportunity for anything, but I have to tell you at the end of the day I am pooped out. 🤪

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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2 hours ago, Chet said:

Sorry Coop, butI think that the riving knife is such an important safety devise that one should just make a commitment to thin or regular kerf as apposed to going with out.

Chet, I don’t disagree. I even purchased the small half moon tab things that fit into drilled holes behind the blade and apparently I drilled one of the holes off a tad and my board got in a bind between it and the fence and the results could have been nasty. 

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6 minutes ago, Coop said:

Chet, I don’t disagree. I even purchased the small half moon tab things that fit into drilled holes behind the blade and apparently I drilled one of the holes off a tad and my board got in a bind between it and the fence and the results could have been nasty. 

Since you're using the inserts, I'd suggest just setting up a couple of ZCIs with the appropriate splitter and change them out as you change blades out.

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1 hour ago, Kev said:

Since you're using the inserts, I'd suggest just setting up a couple of ZCIs with the appropriate splitter and change them out as you change blades out.

Yea, that would be the way to go. 

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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19 hours ago, Coop said:

Along the same note, is a higher powered ts more likely to have a kick back while ripping a wonky board than a lower hp ts? My thought is yes. 

I don't think the HP actually matters kickback hurts at best and is dang dangerous at worst. If you believe or determine you have a wonky board or stress in a board run it through your old friend the bandsaw 🙂 

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I’ve never actually had a kickback but came close when I first started Woodworking and was using a different push block. I forget the name but it had a notch in the front of it and was not holding down on the piece. Dangerous as hell as far as I’m concerned. The question about hp really referred to the fact that with a lower powered unit, you should be able to hear it bog down if the board closes together behind the blade on a rip cut. Not trying to justify not using the riving knife.

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Coop, I can see what your saying about hearing it big down, but if your using hearing protection, you may not hear the saw bog down.  The only time I had a kickback, and it was minor, was not because of the saw struggling it was tension in the wood and no riving knife.  Tension, poor set up/technique and doing stupid s**t are the leading causes in my opinion.  

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Bryan, more exposure to my lack of safety habits. Up until recently, the only time I use hearing protection is with my planer. I have started using it now with the routers. My hearing from 50 years of occupational hazards is minimal at best. 

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13 minutes ago, Coop said:

Bryan, more exposure to my lack of safety habits. Up until recently, the only time I use hearing protection is with my planer. I have started using it now with the routers. My hearing from 50 years of occupational hazards is minimal at best. 

Hearing protection is on the list..  After 30 years in refineries, that message got beat home pretty hard for me..  Refineries have always been strict on this front.  Now, it's only been the last few years or so that I've become better about using it in the shop.  Plus, doing the video thing means trying to show the proper things at the proper time.  

For the record, the same goes for safety glasses.

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Being raised in a family that was in the fire protection business, I have always been exposed to high pressure gasses discharge (CO2) . I’m sure that’s why I and my two brothers have hearing loss. I’m with you on the safety glasses! 

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6 hours ago, Coop said:

Being raised in a family that was in the fire protection business, I have always been exposed to high pressure gasses discharge (CO2) . I’m sure that’s why I and my two brothers have hearing loss. I’m with you on the safety glasses! 

At the end of the day, I'm sure we could all do a much better job about working safer in the shop!  

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