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I asked this of Kev via pm but should have posted it here if anyone was interested and could receive benefit. Question was, is it safe to plunge cut a groove into the edge of a board on the ts to receive a panel. I thought it risky and took the slow route, using the router table, a little bit at a time. Has anyone taken the ts route? 

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5 minutes ago, Coop said:

Should have included Kev’s response in that he thought the same. 

Leave it out for now..  I'm interested in the unbiased responses as well..  

I have no issues with anyone knowing my response either.

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2 hours ago, Coop said:

I asked this of Kev via pm but should have posted it here if anyone was interested and could receive benefit. Question was, is it safe to plunge cut a groove into the edge of a board on the ts to receive a panel. I thought it risky and took the slow route, using the router table, a little bit at a time. Has anyone taken the ts route? 

Just a single pass with the TS?  You mean the face edge of a board and not the end grain edge, right?

As an anecdote; the very first cut I made with my TS, an angle cut on the Modified Ship's Ladder stringer, I approached the cut after plunging and the damn thing jumped out of the cut and nearly off the table and I was sure I had damaged either the guide rail or the saw or both.

I damaged neither.  But, from that time to now I make sure the TS is more FIRMLY in hand (I slowly plunge to depth) and the Kick-Back accessory is in place!

I'll help where I can.

Regards,

RXR

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The cut I am referring to would be a groove along the edge of a board (stiles) to capture a panel. The rails and stiles are joined by dominos and I didn’t want the groove to extend the length of the stile so it would be a stopped groove, ending prior to the first Domino. A plunge cut, similar to what you would do with a router. Hope that makes sense? 

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7 minutes ago, Coop said:

The cut I am referring to would be a groove along the edge of a board (stiles) to capture a panel. The rails and stiles are joined by dominos and I didn’t want the groove to extend the length of the stile so it would be a stopped groove, ending prior to the first Domino. A plunge cut, similar to what you would do with a router. Hope that makes sense? 

Another down side to performing this operation at the TS is the fact that your ends would need a lot of hand work to clean up and get flat.

The safety factor alone would make this a pure NO GO for me!

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Also, as the groove will need to be 1/4” wide, it would mean multiple passes and multiple exposure to a dangerous situation so yeah, I chose the router table. 

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4 hours ago, Coop said:

The cut I am referring to would be a groove along the edge of a board (stiles) to capture a panel. The rails and stiles are joined by dominos and I didn’t want the groove to extend the length of the stile so it would be a stopped groove, ending prior to the first Domino. A plunge cut, similar to what you would do with a router. Hope that makes sense? 

That is a difficult cut to make with any hand-held tool.  Especially making multiple passes with a circular saw of any sort.  My Thought Process Machine instantly envisions disaster, to the material and/or the material handler! 😲

You've a dangerous mind, brother! 😉 😆

🍻,

RXR

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I can't think of any process that would make me want to plunge cut on a TS, it just seems like a process that would do nothing but create an open opportunity for a kick back.  My choices, in order of preference, would be hand held router with my two fences, plunge on the router table or a rabbet and then a fill strip on  the inside like you did with your bathroom door project.  

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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I have done it but the last time it cost me the tip of my finger. Use a Festool plunge saw (I thought of this while getting stitched up in the emergency room 🤦‍♂️) or a router not worth the risk. Fwiw I was making custom grates for my office desk to vent the computer cabinet.

600077802_md2.jpg.68c8f512dc12eddaed13cfebd7b97056.jpg

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4 hours ago, RxR Sawdust Station said:

You've a dangerous mind, brother! 😉 😆

🍻,

RXR

😀

I ended up doing it on the router table. The only reason for asking is that I had 4 ea. 6’ pieces and wondered if there was a faster way to do it safely and the groove was only 3/8” deep.

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3 hours ago, Chet said:

I can't think of any process that would make me want to plunge cut on a TS, it just seems like a process that would do nothing but create an open opportunity for a kick back.  My choices, in order of preference, would be hand held router with my two fences, plunge on the router table or a rabbet and then a fill strip on  the inside like you did with your bathroom door project.  

They are plunge saws, respectfully.

Plunge cuts can be made more safely with one (or two) of these...

https://www.amazon.com/Festool-491582-Guide-Limit-Piece/dp/B001493HTW

The *(or two)* was in referencing using 2 of them as stops.  You can make a stopped groove with 2 of Kickback Stops.

I'm just not sold on doing that on the edge of a board. 🤪 😁

👋,

RXR

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