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My wife is wanting an armoire to take up a corner of of our recently enlarged bedroom. I find myself at her mercy in that she wants it painted as in distressed, antiqued or whatever they call it. Plans are to use 1/2” ply for the side panels, 3/4” hardwood for the frames and 3/4” hardwood for the doors and drawer fronts. It will be 72” tall and 42” wide and 20” deep. I am toying with between birch ply and maple for the hardwood or birch for both. Is there an argument for the hardwood? 

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I added the face frame and the trim to the top. I still need to add 3/4” thick strips on all four sides of the bottom for it to sit on the drawer base. The drawer base will have similar strips on it’s

On just about every project I build, I try and incorporate something new. I liked the way Kev notched his legs to receive the dust frame so I thought I would give it a try. I went back to his dresser

I cut the panels today and glued up the doors. Somehow or another I was able to cut some shims, miked to exactly 1/16” (not shown). With a little hand plane adjustment, I should be ok. Pictured are th

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1 minute ago, Coop said:

My wife is wanting an armoire to take up a corner of of our recently enlarged bedroom. I find myself at her mercy in that she wants it painted as in distressed, antiqued or whatever they call it. Plans are to use 1/2” ply for the side panels, 3/4” hardwood for the frames and 3/4” hardwood for the doors and drawer fronts. It will be 72” tall and 42” wide and 20” deep. I am toying with between birch ply and maple for the hardwood or birch for both. Is there an argument for the hardwood? 

None from me on a painted piece!

I would give Alder a look as it's currently the cheapest species for me..

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I thought alder but find it lowest on the hardness scale at 590. Beech, ash, birch and soft maple are all within the same hardest and price. 

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5 minutes ago, Coop said:

I thought alder but find it lowest on the hardness scale at 590. Beech, ash, birch and soft maple are all within the same hardest and price. 

It is on the soft side but, Poplar is at 540 and is often the paint grade "hardwood" of choice.  How much "abuse" are you really expecting for this piece?  

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I talked with Steve once about hardwoods to be painted.  His number one choice was maple.  I used maple one my kitchen cabinet doors when I did the renovation last fall.  Primes and paints real nice, I highly recommend it.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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14 minutes ago, Chet said:

I talked with Steve once about hardwoods to be painted.  His number one choice was maple.  I used maple one my kitchen cabinet doors when I did the renovation last fall.  Primes and paints real nice, I highly recommend it.

Maple is certainly a great choice!  Up to you if the minor difference in cost is a factor.

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I have used a fair amount of poplar for painted projects and find that it takes paint great, does not break the bank from a cost perspective, and its one of only a few woods I have no issues painting 🙂 

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In the past using poplar on painted products it tends to be a little fuzzy, maple would be my choice.  Around here can get soft maple which is still possibly harder than poplar pretty reasonable and no fuzzies. 

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Just now, Coop said:

I thought about that. Wonder if using a water based sanding sealer prior to the pa#*t would help? 

You may very well just getting away with raising the grain first with water and then sanding back..  A simple test on scrap will answer that for you..

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Just now, Coop said:

I thought about that. Wonder if using a water based sanding sealer prior to the pa#*t would help? 

When I did my kitchen I primed the maple, I wanted to make sure the paint bonds

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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The maple is $4.15 bf and the poplar is 2.45 and that is from a year old price sheet. I have a rough materials list and will call tomorrow for firm pricing. What I ought to do is give her $500 and tell her to buy one that she likes but I’m kinda up for the challenge. 

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2 minutes ago, Coop said:

The maple is $4.15 bf and the poplar is 2.45 and that is from a year old price sheet. I have a rough materials list and will call tomorrow for firm pricing. What I ought to do is give her $500 and tell her to buy one that she likes but I’m kinda up for the challenge. 

lol..  It actually sounds like a fun build but, I certainly understand your thinking!

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I hate painting baseboards, much less semi-rough furniture. Upside is that she doesn’t want anymore walnut in the bedroom, especially at the going price! 

Jamie, you did bring up an interesting point about the fuzzies and Kev about raising the grain. And I don’t want to use solvent based anything on this due to the smell and environment (clean up). 

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Shellac is alcohol base, has very little voc, dries extremely fast and is very easy to clean up.  This is especially true if you use flakes and mix it yourself.

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I keep forgetting about shellac even though Chet tries his best to keep it in front of me👍. So I’ve never used shellac with water based paint. And I can spray the shellac. Does it need to be the dewaxed? 

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1 minute ago, Bob said:

Shellac is alcohol base, has very little voc, dries extremely fast and is very easy to clean up.  This is especially true if you use flakes and mix it yourself.

And I have plenty of the dewaxed flakes. 

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10 minutes ago, Coop said:

I keep forgetting about shellac even though Chet tries his best to keep it in front of me👍. So I’ve never used shellac with water based paint. And I can spray the shellac. Does it need to be the dewaxed? 

Yes, dewaxed if you go the shellac route..

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