Jump to content
Title of the document

Master Bedroom Furniture


Chet
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

I started the bed on this project a few weeks back and it has been slow going for a few reasons.  One even in retirement I only spend 4 or 5 hours a day in the shop because there are other things like reading the paper and drinking coffee.  Second and more of an effect on this project is the size of it and the size of my shop.  Building a king bed in a two car sized shop is a chore.

At first I was thinking that I would build the foot board get it out of the way and then the head board.  Then reality set in, first thing is there are two legs for the foot and two for the head board, also there are three raised panels on each and you are just asking for problems milling the foot board parts first and then trying to duplicate the set-ups when you start to work on the head board.  Along with this there are stile and rail parts that are similar.

This is a long way of saying I have parts stacked all over the shop and every time I want to us a tool there is something that needs to be moved.  Needless to say this slows things down.

I haven't been real diligent in my photo taking but here are some to catch you up.

The first thing i did was a bent lamination for a piece that will be the top molding for the head board.  I started here because I wanted to make the form, us it and then get it out of the way and out of the shop. I also want to use the finished molding to draw my shape on the panel that the molding will go on so they match up nicely.

IMG_0477.thumb.jpg.73daeec6421adbaa0370ac74ac67e4b8.jpg

This was the finished molding, it is a little over an inch square.

IMG_0482.thumb.jpg.3ba14ec0ea11d4643848007acc5ceead.jpg

 

At the same time I started gluing up the legs. I used Poplar in the center and 4/4 sapele front and back.  These are the foot board legs with the head board legs lurking in the background.

IMG_0479.thumb.jpg.2574db8d9a0011110aa6831f8d36cda1.jpg

 

Next I glued on a 1/8 inch thick veneer to hide the glue lines.

Head board legs.

IMG_0480.thumb.jpg.b5ab26846f2dc566b08aecfe17779905.jpg

Foot board legs.

IMG_0481.thumb.jpg.05de01f64ec63a86cfe9965e97e18e79.jpg

IMG_0491.thumb.jpg.da8ad62771c1261b210603864fbd48c9.jpg

After this I worked on the raised panels, no work in process pictures just the final product.  The end grain cove took a lot of hand sanding clear up to 400 to get it to look like the edge grain coving.  I think they all came out pretty nice but I did give more attention to the head board panels (top) as far as matching up the grain to hide glue lines because when you walk into the room they will be more eye level.  Each of the 6 panels is made up of three pieces.

IMG_0490.thumb.jpg.dfb5c3905bf9e97955be5d00da7c2ba7.jpg

I am using floating tenons all around so next up I cut all my mortises in the foot board stiles and rails.  The stiles were first using my mortising jig and a 3/8 up spiral bit.  I cut them 1 1/2 inches deep.

IMG_0498.thumb.jpg.f17980dbf80d2886fe19056d9886bbb1.jpg

Now I don't want you all laughing at this next picture.  The rails are 69 inches long and to cut the mortises in the ends I need to get my jig about 70 inches high.  So I built a down and dirty platform 29 inches tall to clamp my jig to.  I wasn't going to pay the current silly prices for some construction lumber ,but I did have a neighbor having their kitchen  remodeled and I found a couple of scraps of 2 X 10 in his tear out pile that would work along with a couple of pieces of ply on my part.  I had to stand on a stool.

IMG_0495.thumb.jpg.18f16779e54daec983dd1904731208a7.jpg

Then I made a bunch of tenon stock out of scraps.

IMG_0496.thumb.jpg.9f216845bfd5b8c69e507bf9cd43e19a.jpg

 

A dry fit of the foot board.

IMG_0501.thumb.jpg.05634ac1a6443c844d0bce44ceb87952.jpg

 

 

 

IMG_0478.jpg

  • Like 4

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another awesome project!

Interesting choice in the legs with the Poplar centers..  I'm sure you've thought of it but, would love to hear your thoughts around wood movement..  I think I know the answer but, best to let you describe it..

Your bent lamination form is extremely interesting!  Curious about the kerf'd clamping  strip!

Love the raised mortising set up!  I'd of like to have been there drinking a cold one while you did this!  😂

Fantastic design!  Very unique!  Curious what the inspiration was?

As for the space, having been in your shop, I completely understand!  When I did my first shop, my thinking was that open floor space should be filled with tools.  In the second shop, I had no control over the space but understood the importance of open floor space..  In the current shop, I was able to account for that space.  It's actually kind of funny but, I've done a King bed in each of those shops so truly appreciate what you're dealing with!  Guessing you're doing dry assemblies in your living room?

Fantastic build and workmanship as aways!  Thanks for taking us along!

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is some fantastic work and progress Chet! I especially like the grain patterns in the panels of the footboard. I at first questioned the direction of the grain in the upper panels compared to the lower panels but I think it to be a great choice. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Kev said:

I'm sure you've thought of it but, would love to hear your thoughts around wood movement..

I didn't think there would be a problem but the fact that you brought it up has me concerned.  What comes to you mind?

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Chet said:

I didn't think there would be a problem but the fact that you brought it up has me concerned.  What comes to you mind?

Maybe nothing..  What got me thinking was the thick Sapele.  Obviously the grain is run correctly but, I'm sure sure if there will be more/less movement from one species to the other?  I certainly don't see this being an issue on the thin veneer and I'm not so sure it will be with the thicker stuff..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I am doing some research to see if I screwed the pooch on this one.  We just don't see a lot of movement where I live.  I don't work recklessly because of it, I still try to think about wood movement. I never thought about different species together.

I did find this on Woodweb - 

Q. 
I am laminating three layers of 3/4" stock. Since only the exterior layers of the lamination are visible, I'm considering using poplar for the center. My question: is it all right to face glue different species in lamination? This piece will be placed in Tucson, Arizona.

A. 
It is okay to laminate different species so long as the top and bottom are identical thickness and species. It is okay to laminate under any conditions if the MC will never change--it is only when the MC changes that the different shrinkage could (but not always) cause a little warp. - Professor Gene Wengert is Extension Specialist in Wood Processing at the Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

 

 
  • Like 1

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Chet said:

Well I am doing some research to see if I screwed the pooch on this one.  We just don't see a lot of movement where I live.  I don't work recklessly because of it, I still try to think about wood movement. I never thought about different species together.

I did find this on Woodweb - 

Q. 
I am laminating three layers of 3/4" stock. Since only the exterior layers of the lamination are visible, I'm considering using poplar for the center. My question: is it all right to face glue different species in lamination? This piece will be placed in Tucson, Arizona.

A. 
It is okay to laminate different species so long as the top and bottom are identical thickness and species. It is okay to laminate under any conditions if the MC will never change--it is only when the MC changes that the different shrinkage could (but not always) cause a little warp. - Professor Gene Wengert is Extension Specialist in Wood Processing at the Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Like I said, you're probably fine.  Just got me thinking..

I do know we do cutting boards like this all the time and they seem to hold up.

Wasn't my intention to screw up your day doing a bunch of research..  Apologies!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Kev said:

Wasn't my intention to screw up your day doing a bunch of research..  Apologies!

Nothing wrong with educating ones self here and there.  It may make me of service down the road to someone else.

Also I saw a chart that showed the radial and tangential shrinkage of wood.  Both were 4.6 percent radial and sepele was 7.4 tangential and poplar was 8.2.  These numbers were from green to kiln dried.  So I would think that seasonal movement would be a pretty tiny fraction of that.

  • Like 1

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Chet said:

Nothing wrong with educating ones self here and there.  It may make me of service down the road to someone else.

Also I saw a chart that showed the radial and tangential shrinkage of wood.  Both were 4.6 percent radial and sepele was 7.4 tangential and poplar was 8.2.  These numbers were from green to kiln dried.  So I would think that seasonal movement would be a pretty tiny fraction of that.

That's interesting!  I never worried about it with thin material and will now worry about it a bit less with thicker material.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Kev said:

Your bent lamination form is extremely interesting!  Curious about the kerf'd clamping  strip!

I was out in the shop when I realized in talking about wood movement I failed to respond to some of your other questions.  I don't know if you recall from Morris chair there was a top and bottom to the form for that arm laminations.  Because of the length of this piece and the depth of the curve I thought that it would be a bit cumbersome during the clamping process to use something similar.  Your do need some sort of caul or you will get bubbles in the lamination, so I went with some MDF kerfed about every 3/4"  It worked real well.

 

17 hours ago, Kev said:

Love the raised mortising set up!  I'd of like to have been there drinking a cold one while you did this!

Every time I got on the stool I bumped my head on a light fixture.  I finally got smart enough to raise the fixture up.

 

17 hours ago, Kev said:

Fantastic design!  Very unique!  Curious what the inspiration was?

Just like the nightstands I am using the existing queen bed for ideas so everything look like it sort of belongs together.

  • Like 1

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I made some caps for the legs.  I started with some blocks 1 3/4" thick and the same width and depth as the legs. I set the table saw blade at 15° and cut the two short sides and then the two long sides, pushing a scrap behind them so I didn't get any digits tangled up in the saw blade.

IMG_0499.thumb.jpg.fe9302fd76b6be9d6456279b05801ad6.jpg

 

I took some lengths of scraps and made up some molding to go with the caps and also at the base of the legs.  I there should be way more then needed of the three different moldings but I don't want to have to go back and recreate something at the last minute.

IMG_0512.thumb.jpg.777051ee0d3fa364eff42c73b730d112.jpg

 

Next thing up was to put a coat of shellac on the panels and the edges of all the stiles and rails before I start the glue ups.  I put some blue tape on the edges where glue will be applied.

IMG_0505.thumb.jpg.1e24dbe77f8a2cb4b57664f8f9f9ddc2.jpg

 

The first glue up was the lower section that has the three panels.

614507228_IMG_05072.thumb.jpg.3625ed4e2fc359f760dd5fb503797a0e.jpg

 

When that dried I added the horizontal panels and top rail.

IMG_0508.thumb.jpg.a0a11a4b89c805d8063f554757405434.jpg

 

After that came out of the clamps I used a flush trim bit and straight edge to trim just a fuzz off of the edges so the legs will set perfectly flush with the panel section.  This section was 69" in length and after running the router along it its now 68 31/32"

IMG_0514.thumb.jpg.2d1dd656bdf08ee4521a54d8fbc85145.jpg

 

 

IMG_0508.jpg

  • Like 4

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...