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30 minutes ago, Woodenskye (Bryan) said:

Not sure how it happened but all my pockets seem to be 1 knuckle deep at the moment.  😳

Ditto!

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On to door assembly......start out by hand sanding the mill marks on the raised panels. Not a fun process to do and only way I’ve found is to do it by hand. I can’t seem to find my hand sanding pad, I

Had a little rain today which allowed me to leave work a little early. Got about 4 hours in the shop late afternoon into evening.    Started off by cleaning up the squeeze out off the panels an

Did find a little time to go get the cherry for the cabinets. Tried a new source about an hour from home. Called them up to just check a price and to see what they offered. I did check around on cherr

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2 hours ago, Woodenskye (Bryan) said:

Not sure how it happened but all my pockets seem to be 1 knuckle deep at the moment.

I always thought that was just the way they were made.  We should looking to that company called Deep Pockets, maybe their pants pockets are a better fit.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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3 hours ago, Chet said:

I always thought that was just the way they were made.  We should looking to that company called Deep Pockets, maybe their pants pockets are a better fit.

I don’t think finding deep pockets will do much good with my alligator arms!  They really limit my reach. 

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Had a little rain today which allowed me to leave work a little early. Got about 4 hours in the shop late afternoon into evening. 
 

Started off by cleaning up the squeeze out off the panels and ripping them to width. The door panels I ripped to allow 1/4 of movement. Which might be a little to much space. Typically I have used 1/2” deep tongue cutters and used 1/4” space balls to keep the panels from rattling, with the 3/8” cutters that I have that doesn’t leave a lot of room to use the space balls. I might try to find some foam to place in the grove to help with it. CFFC6282-7045-4ED2-8BEE-3F3E8AA68FEE.thumb.jpeg.bfed3d989c49b2411cc75de4d4e4851b.jpeg

All the panels and drawer fronts surfaced to .820 or a strong 13/16”. There are a few that were to wide for my planer and will be taking them to the cabinet shop to have them run them for me. 
 

From there I went on to cutting all the stile and rail parts. All these parts are cut 1/8” longer than the finished size on the cut list. 6E2AB63F-C769-4E3C-92FF-B4FF2CE5A67E.thumb.jpeg.ccc8adfc057e0acc5d3630a675dc5830.jpeg

To keep them all organized I do write the length on each piece, which might be overkill since they are all stacked by length. The stiles all are placed on the cart length wise and the rails go the opposite way. Just something I have always done to help me keep them all a bit organized. These parts are also planed to .820

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Setting up the shaper to do the tongue cut is pretty critical.  I have added the extra cutter to the set that allows me to trim off some of the tongue.  I like this just for the fact that you know your parts will be square. As you can see I’m removing 1/16” off the tongue, do that on both ends and there is the 1/8” oversized cut.  

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Before I ran parts I gave the shaper and the sled a good waxing.  This cut would be pretty hard to do without a sled that clamps your piece in place.  The part actually registers off the infeed fence and the clamp holds it there.  The outfeed fence really is only there for support when taking the pice out of the clamp.  

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Did get a stack of parts ran before had to go to the house. 

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8 minutes ago, Kev said:

That's a good amount of work in a few hours!  Nice job!

Yeah I was surprised how much I got worked up. Also had to take the dust barrels out and dump them. Running them panels fills the drum in a hurry!  Have made about 80 gallons of dust already in this project so far. 

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12 minutes ago, Coop said:

I like your shaper set up Jamie. Nice work! Steve turned me onto Lexel in lieu of space balls. Might want to consider it. 

You have to explain to me what lexel is....

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12 minutes ago, Coop said:

I like your shaper set up Jamie. Nice work! Steve turned me onto Lexel in lieu of space balls. Might want to consider it. 

Darryl Peart doesn't use either..  He dabs a little hot glue on the backside of the panel.

For the floating panels in the current bed build, I dabbed a little glue in the bottom middle of each panel.  This still allows for expansions but, reduces the rattle.

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It is a type of clear silicone that according to their claim, that never really sets up. I have used it on several panel projects and also setting panels of glass in my door and have been pleased with it. Although advertised on HD   Web site, I only find it a Lowe’s. Small, clear plastic tube with a resealable cap. 

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1 minute ago, Coop said:

It is a type of clear silicone that according to their claim, that never really sets up. I have used it on several panel projects and also setting panels of glass in my door and have been pleased with it. Although advertised on HD   Web site, I only find it a Lowe’s. Small, clear plastic tube with a resealable cap. 

If you get me some product info @Coop, I'll try to find it on Amazon and add an affiliate link for it.

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9 minutes ago, Coop said:

It is a type of clear silicone that according to their claim, that never really sets up. I have used it on several panel projects and also setting panels of glass in my door and have been pleased with it. Although advertised on HD   Web site, I only find it a Lowe’s. Small, clear plastic tube with a resealable cap. 

So you just put a small dab in the grove?

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Yeah, since it is expandable, multiple dabs won’t hurt, depending on the size of the panel. Like any other silicon or glue, just be wary of the amount of squeeze out as you don’t want any to surface. Might want to play with some scrap material to test the amount. 

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If you do get any squeeze out with the Lexel just let it dry and it cleans up pretty easy with an exacto knife.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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  • 2 weeks later...

Overdue update.....

Had a pretty major hiccup with the door style and rail cutters. Assumption....bit me in the butt. I did assume that the brand new cutters wouldn’t need any shimming or adjustment. Boy was I wrong....about 30 thousands off. The tongue was loose and the ogee profile was just as bad. 29EFF285-A0B1-4C13-9779-D21605677CA1.thumb.jpeg.822fc96f349dd6eed3c32fabded945a0.jpeg

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I messed around trying to get it shimmed to fit but it’s not possible. The ogee shape on the tongue is not matching up to the groove cut at all, got the tongue to fit tight but just no way to adjust the profile. Reached out to infinity via email a week ago Saturday, got an instant response saying 24-48 hours for a response. On Wednesday I called them after not hearing a word. Talked to a nice lady who said the technician was working on it and should get a response by Thursday. Friday I called them again, same story tech was working on it. They are located in Florida and close for the weekend at 5 my time. At 5 min to 5 I got an email from the tech requesting more pictures. I sent them and am waiting to hear back. 
 

Decided to put the doors on hold and moved on to the face frames. Milled all 4 sides of the face frame parts through the planer. Having the digital gauge on the planer makes this super easy and accurate. Cut all the parts to length at the mitersaw. 1E401A3D-9ABA-46C7-B1C9-DABCF977FA83.thumb.jpeg.74758a44839bbbb1b56446286676ba14.jpeg

I sort the parts as I cut, on my cut list every part is identified by a cabinet number. As I cut the different widths of stock starting with the longest working to shortest each part gets the cabinet number wrote on it and is stacked in order. Makes it pretty easy to find the right parts for assembly of the face frames. 
 

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Face frames are assembled using pocket screws. Fast and easy way to put them together. I clamp them to my bench and with the vice grip clamps it makes it go pretty fast. 
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For repeatability of spaces I cut a block and use it to set the gaps. 
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Here is a picture of most of the face frames assembled. I do have them all put together. I will be taking these to a shop to get sent through a wide belt. Really probably could’ve sanded the parts to final thickness and cleaned them up after assembly, this was before I had the new drum sander so at the time that was the best option for me. 
 

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Started back in on the doors today, decided to use a different tongue and groove cutter set that I have. More of a bead than the ogee style. Shouldn’t really make much difference in the final product. Had to cut new rail parts to remove the ogee profile. Ended up not being very much wasted lumber as I cut the new parts out of the old as much as I could. Ended up cutting 4 new 8’ pieces of door stock. B8F09904-6C16-4072-8519-C2812F629AE3.thumb.jpeg.e898dc8c152def6629d1deaaadff410c.jpeg

 

Didnt take any pictures of the process since it’s the same steps as the previous post. Did get all the parts ran. 
 

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Using the table saw to trim up the panels to length. Got through about 3/4 of them before had to get outside and do a few things in the yard. 

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That's a lot of parts to deal with!  Fortunately, the batching process makes that pretty easy once you're set up!

Nice work!

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2 minutes ago, Kev said:

That's a lot of parts to deal with!  Fortunately, the batching process makes that pretty easy once you're set up!

Nice work!

You are spot on with the lot of parts. When dealing with this many organization is key. It’s pretty sickening writing on every part but it pays off in the end. It will save a lot more time than measuring them all a handful of times. The door panels especially are great to have numbered. Problem is you plane off your info so I try to remember to put it on the edge. I think you can see a little chicken scratch on the edge in the picture of the panel on the table saw. It then get rewrote on the face because the edge will be mostly removed by the panel raising. 

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2 minutes ago, Jamie said:

You are spot on with the lot of parts. When dealing with this many organization is key. It’s pretty sickening writing on every part but it pays off in the end. It will save a lot more time than measuring them all a handful of times. The door panels especially are great to have numbered. Problem is you plane off your info so I try to remember to put it on the edge. I think you can see a little chicken scratch on the edge in the picture of the panel on the table saw. It then get rewrote on the face because the edge will be mostly removed by the panel raising. 

Even with just 2 nightstands, I have handwritten notes all over the ends of each part..lol. I tend to label the joints than go together. Rail end A goes to leg location A, etc..  In multiple pieces I change up each by using letters on one and numbers on another.. If I get more than 2, I have to get a little more creative.

 

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1 minute ago, Kev said:

Even with just 2 nightstands, I have handwritten notes all over the ends of each part..lol. I tend to label the joints than go together. Rail end A goes to leg location A, etc..  In multiple pieces I change up each by using letters on one and numbers on another.. If I get more than 2, I have to get a little more creative.

 

This is 18 cabinets, for instance on let’s say a basic single drawer base cabinet there are 5 parts to the frame. Let’s call the cabinet #3 in the run.  The stiles get a 3a, the top and rail for the drawer space get 3b and the bottom rail gets labeled 3c. 
 

I use that same labeling process for every face frame. Start with the sides and then work from the top down. If I can remember correctly one of the pantry cabinets is stretched out to letter F. 
 

Can never have enough notes! I think as long as we can wrap our own heads around a label it should all come out in the end with a minimal pile of scrap. 
 

 

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3 minutes ago, Jamie said:

This is 18 cabinets, for instance on let’s say a basic single drawer base cabinet there are 5 parts to the frame. Let’s call the cabinet #3 in the run.  The stiles get a 3a, the top and rail for the drawer space get 3b and the bottom rail gets labeled 3c. 
 

I use that same labeling process for every face frame. Start with the sides and then work from the top down. If I can remember correctly one of the pantry cabinets is stretched out to letter F. 
 

Can never have enough notes! I think as long as we can wrap our own heads around a label it should all come out in the end with a minimal pile of scrap. 
 

 

As long as you have a system that works for you..

My nightstands were a little tricky as the parts were all grain matched..  For instance, the front upper/lower rails were side by side in the same board..  Same with the legs, etc...

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6 minutes ago, Kev said:

As long as you have a system that works for you..

My nightstands were a little tricky as the parts were all grain matched..  For instance, the front upper/lower rails were side by side in the same board..  Same with the legs, etc...

Yeah that adds a whole new level to the organization. 

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Thats a bummer abut the cutters being off.   When I was doing my kitchen doors recently I brain farted and didn't allow for the tongue on the rails.  It worked out where each set went down one size and I had to make new ones for the smallest sets of rails.

I number on the end grain then once I have the joint cut I start labeling the tenon and mortises.  I have gotten pretty good at writing legibly inside a mortise.  I use a number and letter on everything, i.e. 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, so matting mortise and tenons will both  say 1a.  

And like you said it is a matter of coming up with your system.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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