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Kitchen cabinets


Jamie
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Just now, Jamie said:

Question for you guys on the track saws........do you have to clamp them in place or can you line it up and let it rip?

I can only speak for the Festool so, do more homework if you're looking at the Makita or one of the others..

Festool doesn't "require" the clamps.  However, if I'm putting a spinning blade to an expensive piece of lumber you better bet your @$$ I've got it clamped down!  To be honest, I can't remember the last time I didn't clamp the track to the work.

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1 minute ago, Kev said:

I can only speak for the Festool so, do more homework if you're looking at the Makita or one of the others..

Festool doesn't "require" the clamps.  However, if I'm putting a spinning blade to an expensive piece of lumber you better bet your @$$ I've got it clamped down!  To be honest, I can't remember the last time I didn't clamp the track to the work.

That’s good to know. I’ve seen many videos on them and some clamp and others don’t. 
 

I think I’d be money ahead using my homemade one. Which is kinda a “L” shape. I only have to clamp the long end as the short side of the L provides enough friction to keep it in place. Not knocking track saws but don’t seem worth the $ to me at this point. Maybe just to many other tools on the wish list. 

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When doing something for shop furniture I don't clamp and things come out grea, but yea, when it something nice and money is on the line I clamp.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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6 minutes ago, Jamie said:

That’s good to know. I’ve seen many videos on them and some clamp and others don’t. 
 

I think I’d be money ahead using my homemade one. Which is kinda a “L” shape. I only have to clamp the long end as the short side of the L provides enough friction to keep it in place. Not knocking track saws but don’t seem worth the $ to me at this point. Maybe just to many other tools on the wish list. 

You can certainly get by with homemade version but, once you go to a track saw, you'll kick yourself for not doing it sooner.  I know a lot of people like the Makita and they work with the Festool tracks.  Regardless, none of them are cheap!

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6 minutes ago, Kev said:

Makita and they work with the Festool tracks.

This is true to a point.  The Makita offset is different then the Festool saw.  I don't know which way but before I would let a Makita owner borrow my tracks I would want to see that their saw doesn't cut my zero clearance edge and make it useless for me. 😧

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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3 minutes ago, Chet said:

This is true to a point.  The Makita offset is different then the Festool saw.  I don't know which way but before I would let a Makita owner borrow my tracks I would want to see that their saw doesn't cut my zero clearance edge and make it useless for me. 😧

That's the first I've heard of that but, not doubting you..  I also know the zero clearance edges are replaceable.

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Got a few hours of shop time in today. Spent some of the day moving the boat out of the shop and putting it in my wife’s garage. Which she didn’t complain to much about and actually gave me a hand cleaning her garage up some. Her garage typically stores her vehicle, kids bikes/toys, golf cart and a fridge. I guess I also have a wall mounted lumber rack in there as well. Also in there at this time there is a small chicken coop in there. That will be moving outside once the chickens grow a bit. 
 

Anyways on to the project....I am waiting for a few orders to come in on supplies. Mostly waiting on some smaller headed pocket screws to put the face frames together. Found when using the washer head screws that they  are a little to big when going through a sander that you will sand some of the washer off. Sparks in a sander probably isn’t the best idea and it wears the paper out pretty quick. 
 

Decided to work on getting the door panels glued up. 
D5290DD6-B11F-4E4A-9DF4-83F443255589.thumb.jpeg.1bf8e163e4009b83e2318d43a745b916.jpeg

The stack of cherry I have to pick from. The board on the right was 13” and really flat. The board on the left with the sap wood is the worst board in the stack. 5086DCC2-B73C-4C4E-81A6-740001314E41.thumb.jpeg.a5bd49365220e91dca78f179f4899c7c.jpeg

Did take a couple minutes and put all the door panels and drawer fronts into a spread sheet. Makes for easy sorting by length and width. Couldn’t get my printer to work so took the computer out to the shop with me. 
 

With these boards all having one straight edge I started with the boards narrower than 6” and rough cut them to 1” longer than the finished size of the panel. The reason I go 1” longer is that when cutting to size it makes it easy to know your final length if for some reason your measurements get removed from the piece. 
 

I made a quick little measurement scale on the edge of my bench. Did tack a piece to the edge to have a stop block. Doing it this way makes it quick to see if you have the width you need for your panels. 7890DF1B-0061-42E3-BD55-210F8C734953.thumb.jpeg.85ce4b85de05a2ea5c075dc5f53e9c83.jpeg

8452145A-ED99-4EB6-918C-A1B018C1A7C1.thumb.jpeg.e5f8fdd6e83f1ce23d0853383a77d802.jpeg

 

After getting to a wider width than needed the boards then go across the tablesaw to clean up the rough side. Then select the best grain orientation and if the joints aren’t tight a quick pass over the jointer. I would say about 30% of the joints needed to be jointed. 
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Glue up is pretty straight forward, apply the glue with a bottle and spread with a rubber titebond brush.  This is a painfully slow process for me, the cabinet shop I worked at had a foot operated glue spreader that you would push your foot down on and it would lift an aluminum grid up that you would set the edge of the boards on. Would take 3-4 boards at a time and made it a quick process. Especially with the rotating clamp rack and panel flatener. 
 

This project has really shown my shortage of clamps. I currently only have 10 pipe clamps, when you use 3 clamps per panel it takes some time to get these glued up. I do have 8 more clamps ordered and should be here in a day or two. 
F49BB831-7EF1-4C05-B2D3-787A75F1D518.thumb.jpeg.0f307efb362a4d82e1e037b63e5b43da.jpeg

After the panels come out of the clamps I like to get the glue scraped off. I use just an old paint scraper. Like to get it before the drips are completely dried. Seem to come off a lot easier if they are a little tacky yet. Basically the outside of the drip is hard and the inside is soft yet. 

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For spreading glue on panel glue ups, I typically apply glue to one surface and then rub the mating surface against it to ensure both sides are covered..  Then clamp per normal..

Looking like a pretty good stack of Cherry!

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7 minutes ago, Kev said:

For spreading glue on panel glue ups, I typically apply glue to one surface and then rub the mating surface against it to ensure both sides are covered..  Then clamp per normal..

Looking like a pretty good stack of Cherry!

Why have I never done that? I might be heading to the shop yet tonight. 

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1 hour ago, Kev said:

That's the first I've heard of that but, not doubting you..  I also know the zero clearance edges are replaceable.

Someone mentioned it one one of the podcasts I listen to, I have no personal experience.  I would have to quit being a nice guy if I had to replace my edge every time I share my tracks. Lol

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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10 hours ago, Chet said:

Someone mentioned it one one of the podcasts I listen to, I have no personal experience.  I would have to quit being a nice guy if I had to replace my edge every time I share my tracks. Lol

I believe Chet is 100% correct on this.  I know for certain that if you have the TS75 and TS55 you need to adjust so both are the same. 

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22 hours ago, Coop said:

So the only ply will be the backs? 

The cabinet box sides, tops and bottoms will be 3/4” ply. The backs and drawer bottoms will be 1/2” ply. 

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Clamps came in yesterday, just in time! Had a local plumbing shop cut me some pipe for the,  0B8DBCFC-DD3A-4A0B-853E-CC6AE917602C.thumb.jpeg.c23ee9041ea0130836978bd89394bf35.jpeg

 

Still not enough clamps! But an improvement from what I had. 570CE928-BDCD-41CA-BA51-251824FA8E23.thumb.jpeg.e9878677f60fcfc1e8ea14b99c426448.jpeg

Did get all the panels rough cut to length and ready to be glued up. At this point I have 3 panels left to get glued which I will do either tonight yet or tomorrow morning before work. 

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Looking great!

I've had good luck picking up the pipe at the big box store..  Now I just have to figure out how I'm going to store the long ones....lol

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39 minutes ago, Kev said:

Looking great!

I've had good luck picking up the pipe at the big box store..  Now I just have to figure out how I'm going to store the long ones....lol

I actually store some longer pipe up on the lumber rack, have taken the clamp parts off them because they aren’t used that often. Big box store is about an hour trip for me, the plumber is about a half mile from work. They sell it just so much a foot and so much to thread. When I picked it up they didn’t have a bill figured up yet. Will let you know what they cost me. 

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13 hours ago, Kev said:

Now I just have to figure out how I'm going to store the long ones....lol

I remove the clamps, store them in a drawer and the pipe is out in the shed.  

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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5 minutes ago, Chet said:

I remove the clamps, store them in a drawer and the pipe is out in the shed.  

I'm not sure it would hurt to leave the heads on since my other buildings are wether tight and we don't have much humidity here.

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Just now, Kev said:

I'm not sure it would hurt to leave the heads on since my other buildings are wether tight and we don't have much humidity here.

I did it mainly to make storing the pipe a little tidier in the small shed.

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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3 minutes ago, Chet said:

I did it mainly to make storing the pipe a little tidier in the small shed.

Agreed..  I'm thinking of putting them in the rafters of my small shed..

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13 minutes ago, Woodenskye (Bryan) said:

Maybe you need a medium shed for storing clamps and a spray booth.  Any problem is solvable with the green stuff! 😀

Yea, it's just a matter of how deep the pockets are..

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