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Kitchen cabinets


Jamie
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On 3/5/2021 at 8:28 PM, Coop said:

Jamie, are these put on hold until after the desk is completed? 

They are on hold waiting for her lender.  It has taken longer than expected with the appraisal and such to get wrapped up.  She should be getting a down payment to me in the next week or so.  Which should give me time to complete the desk.

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  • 1 month later...
51 minutes ago, Kev said:

Remember, big bits, slow speed!

If I remember right doesn't Jamie have a shaper for those big boy bits.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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6 hours ago, Chet said:

If I remember right doesn't Jamie have a shaper for those big boy bits.

Yep have a shaper. All be it not an over powered shaper. It’s a 3 hp grizzly, works pretty well for stile and rail cuts for raised panels with a back cut its a little under powered. Just move the fence to take a couple lighter passes.  I really like using a shaper. When everything is set up properly they are smooth machines.  These cutters came from infinity, have never used their cutters before. They do seem really well made for the price point they come in at. Didn’t want to break the bank on them considering I’m not sure how many projects they will get used on. Thought about going with insert cutters but never seem to get a very good fit from them. To many moving parts in my opinion. 
 

Am more excited about the saw blade than any of the tooling! My ww2 Forrest blade got destroyed by a neighbor who had to make a quick cut while I wasn’t home. Had a piece of plywood bind up on him somehow and got a nasty kick back.  Sent the piece flying into my garage door and left a pretty good dent, took a tooth right off the Forrest and bent the blade. Luckily he walked away with all his parts. Which is the important part of the story. 

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45 minutes ago, Jamie said:

Am more excited about the saw blade than any of the tooling! My ww2 Forrest blade got destroyed by a neighbor who had to make a quick cut while I wasn’t home. Had a piece of plywood bind up on him somehow and got a nasty kick back.  Sent the piece flying into my garage door and left a pretty good dent, took a tooth right off the Forrest and bent the blade. Luckily he walked away with all his parts. Which is the important part of the story. 

WOW! 😬

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I think If I ever have to replace my 3 Freud blades, besides Freud, I think Amana would be on the list of ones to look at.

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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9 hours ago, Chet said:

I think If I ever have to replace my 3 Freud blades, besides Freud, I think Amana would be on the list of ones to look at.

The few cuts I’ve made with it so far I must say I’m impressed. Not quite as glassy of a cut as the Forrest but for half the money it is pretty nice. It is the 1/8” kerf which I do like. 
 

Not sure if I’m going to send the Forrest blade in for repairs, this blade has been repaired once before which was my own mistake. Hate to throw it out, it’s not very old of a blade and has quite a bit of life left in it. Don’t think it will be repaired for less than $100 with shipping.  

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55 minutes ago, Jamie said:

It is the 1/8” kerf which I do like. 

Yea,  I like full kerf blades myself.

 

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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36 minutes ago, Coop said:

I’m about to experience my first WWII  thanks to Kev, 

You will love it! If you look on their website I believe there is an old video explaining how the blade should be used, if I remember right they recommend having the blade pretty high over the thickness of the piece you are cutting. Because of the hook angle, they said it’s safer having more blade exposed to lessen the odds of a kick back. Which almost makes sense with it cutting more downward into the table than pushing it back towards you. 
 

It was a old poor quality video if I remember correctly, like it was filmed on a vhs camcorder. I’ll see if I can dig it up. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Did find a little time to go get the cherry for the cabinets. Tried a new source about an hour from home. Called them up to just check a price and to see what they offered. I did check around on cherry prices and the had quite a bit of range. Priced select and better 4/4 planed to 15/16” and straight line ripped. Highest price was 5 min away at $5.33, $4.75 was an hour north of me and $3.75 was an hour south. I decided to go south and give the new company a try. They are a pretty big lumber dealer, send about half their lumber overseas. The salesman told me that they have moved 9 million bf in the past 10 months. 
 

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It took them a couple days to process my order of 275-300 bf.  When I got there a couple guys jumped on a couple fork lifts and loaded it up. One forklift picked up the bundle and another had a pusher type attachment that slid it right in. 
 

Not sure if I mentioned that the black truck I had has now turned red. Picked it up a couple months back. 19 ram bighorn with the 5.7. Few more options than the old truck which I’m really enjoying. 
 

I did have to stack all the boards by hand when I got home. Leaned them up against the wall to be able to sort through them. 
 

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Did get the door stile and rail material along with the face frame material ripped up tonight. I rip all the parts 1/8” over finish width. The door parts will all get 1/16” removed when cutting the grove and another 1/16” will come off with the door edge cutter. This can make it a little confusing when cutting door parts, have to add 1/8” length to make it all come out to size. 
 

The face frame parts being 1/8” over sized will allow me to remove around 1/16 of each edge to remove saw blade marks. Will do the bulk of the removal with the planer. Will leave about 15 thousands to take off with the drum sander. The critical dimension in building face frame cabinets is the stile width. Mine are all 1 1/2” wide except when they are against a wall, then they are 2” to allow for scribing. If your width is off on these measurements it can make your whole run of cabinets shrink or grow a bit. It’s not really critical on this kitchen but in a case when going wall to wall it can really make it tough to put them in. 
 

Also wanted to point out that there has been very little waste so far. The widths of these parts let’s you utilize almost all the available width. When ripping I start with the widest parts and work my way down.  If I’m ripping off a piece from a wider board and get down to around 3” remaining that board will go back on the pile to be used for panel glue ups.  I didn’t get a picture of the waste pile from all the ripping but the off cuts are really just slivers.

One thing as well, none of these parts have hit the jointer. For the face frames if there is a bow the plywood will take it out. Don’t get me wrong the pieces are fairly straight. I won’t use a piece that is really twisted up for a long piece. Cut the bowed or twisted pieces down shorter to use them. 
 

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Did get the parts run through the planer on one side to finish up for the night.  One thing I should also mention is this cherry was pretty sap wood free. The piece you see going through the planer will be a door part, sap doesn’t go through to the front so will be the back side and the sap side will be the grove side of the door. With the stain going on these I can use up boards like that. 

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You look to be of to a good start.  

I have a dealer about an hour south who's prices are lower and product is better looking then my local guy.  But it isn't worth it all the time depending on how much i need.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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4 hours ago, Coop said:

Jamie, given your description of the loading, you didn’t get to pick the boards? We’re you happy with what they gave you? Darn good prices. 

Nope I didn’t get to pick.  Out of the whole stack I didn’t find much that I was disappointed with. I shouldn’t say disappointed....I didn’t find a single board that I wouldn’t use 90% of. Has really been a nice stack. Less than a handful of knots and very few pitch pockets.  All in all very happy with it. I like the idea of buying the best lumber I can get. Just makes much less waste. 

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44 minutes ago, Coop said:

What are you breaking the ply down with? 

Well am planning on using the tablesaw to do the bulk of it. Thinking I might build a cabinet extension table for the left side of the blade to help support some of the cross cuts. Have been thinking about this quite a bit actually. Ideas are get one of the neighbors to help, build the extension table, or do some cross cutting with the circular saw and homemade track. If I go the circular saw route I would count them a tad long and finish cut to length on the tablesaw for the consistency factor. 
 

Really wish I had the room and the pocket book for a nice sliding table saw. 

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6 minutes ago, Jamie said:

Well am planning on using the tablesaw to do the bulk of it. Thinking I might build a cabinet extension table for the left side of the blade to help support some of the cross cuts. Have been thinking about this quite a bit actually. Ideas are get one of the neighbors to help, build the extension table, or do some cross cutting with the circular saw and homemade track. If I go the circular saw route I would count them a tad long and finish cut to length on the tablesaw for the consistency factor. 
 

Really wish I had the room and the pocket book for a nice sliding table saw. 

Although I'm not a Rockler fan, their Material mate is really good for wrestling sheet goods by yourself!

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When I first was made aware of the track saw's existence, I thought of it as a "luxury" tool and when you think of the price it still is.  Now after owning mine for 3 or 4 years, I have moved my thinking on the tool as a "game changer" in the shop.  Especially in a small shop like mine.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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3 hours ago, Chet said:

When I first was made aware of the track saw's existence, I thought of it as a "luxury" tool and when you think of the price it still is.  Now after owning mine for 3 or 4 years, I have moved my thinking on the tool as a "game changer" in the shop.  Especially in a small shop like mine.

If memory serves me, I think we bought 2 of them that day...lol

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1 hour ago, Kev said:

If memory serves me, I think we bought 2 of them that day...lol

We bought the TS-55 at Woodcraft one week end.  We were starting the Camphor slab table.  Late in the day we found out it wouldn't cut deep enough at 45° for the slab.  The following week end we went to a lumber yard in Santa Cruz that had the TS-75 on hand.  I have always been happy that I bought the TS-55 from you over the bigger model.  I haven't ever wished I had the larger one.  If memory serves a friend of yours in Washington bought the TS-75

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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23 minutes ago, Chet said:

We bought the TS-55 at Woodcraft one week end.  We were starting the Camphor slab table.  Late in the day we found out it wouldn't cut deep enough at 45° for the slab.  The following week end we went to a lumber yard in Santa Cruz that had the TS-75 on hand.  I have always been happy that I bought the TS-55 from you over the bigger model.  I haven't ever wished I had the larger one.  If memory serves a friend of yours in Washington bought the TS-75

Yes, they were both sold off to you and my buddy Ray in WA for pretty killer prices..  Needed to get the job done so, it was just like expensive rental for me and they ended up in the hands of talented woodworkers that both still use them to this day..  Paying it forward if you will and never regretting a minute of it!

Full disclosure...  I do wish I had the 55 in my shop!  I will probably add it at some point.  The 75 is great but, overkill for breaking down sheet goods!

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