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I got this today from Whiteside for the mortises. That one mean looking bit! 

Well, after 10 weeks, we finally got the building permit and the slab forming will start tomorrow. Although the door won’t be installed for a couple of months, I got the itch to start back working on

I sure need no frost until about Christmas in order to get the tomatoes safely into canning and on blt’s. Got the first coat of ARS on one side of the door today. Also got the holes drilled for the ha

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It’s usually me hijacking other threads so I kind of feel honored in a weird sort of way. The glass retaining strips; I guess I have several options with glue not being one of them? Steve, wdwerker, always suggested a particular non hardening silicon. That coupled with Brad nails might would work if a replacement is needed. Or I could use the little spacer balls to prevent rattle? Any suggestions?

Finish: My thoughts, and only since I’ve had good results, 2 coats of ARS & multiple coats of GF HP water based top coat. This is for the bathroom but hopefully there won’t be enough humidity to affect the water based finish. Also opinions? 

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15 minutes ago, Coop said:

It’s usually me hijacking other threads so I kind of feel honored in a weird sort of way. The glass retaining strips; I guess I have several options with glue not being one of them? Steve, wdwerker, always suggested a particular non hardening silicon. That coupled with Brad nails might would work if a replacement is needed. Or I could use the little spacer balls to prevent rattle? Any suggestions?

Finish: My thoughts, and only since I’ve had good results, 2 coats of ARS & multiple coats of GF HP water based top coat. This is for the bathroom but hopefully there won’t be enough humidity to affect the water based finish. Also opinions? 

Once you have the glass, I would assess how it fits to determine if anything is needed for the rattle factor.  If it is, I would probably go with a few spots of silicone just to stop the rattle but, not so much as to make it difficult to remove.

You should be fine on the finish front!

On a bathroom finish side note..  I did a towel rack a couple years ago in Teak and finished it with Salad Bowl Finish from GF.  I will say that I am downright IMPRESSED with how that finish has held up on an item that gets towels dragged off of it every day.  Absolutely no sign of wear at all!  It looks as good today as the day I applied finish to it!

 

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22 hours ago, Coop said:

Steve, wdwerker, always suggested a particular non hardening silicon.

This is the stuff Steve recommends. Excel Clear

I have been using it everytime I set glass since his recommendation.  A small bead on all four sides of the rabbet back away fro the edge so it doesn't squeeze out and show the use pin nailer to put you strips in.  Pin nailer is better then brad nailer, the force of a brad nailer can crack the glass, don't ask me how I know.

If you don't have a pin nailer you can pre drill small holes at an angle in you strips and use a small hammer to set the brads.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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I need to learn how to utilize google more. They say that pin nailers have no holding power other than to hold the piece until the glue dries and I don’t think I want to use glue on these strips. But also see that a pin nailer leaves less of a scar. 

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2 hours ago, Coop said:

The cover strips will be 5/8” thick x 1/2” if that makes a difference? 

Brad nailer would probably be okay then.  Yea, you don't want to use glue on your strips, you want to be able to remove them if you have to replace a pane of broken glass.  But if you had the pin nailer it would still work for this situation because the strips aren't under any strain or stress, they're almost decorative, the Excel is holding the glass.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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On 9/21/2020 at 7:49 PM, Coop said:

As the rabbets cut into the stiles as well, I’m thinking butt joints, rails into stiles would be better on the trim pieces than miter joints. 

Going back to this conversation.  Butt joints is what you want to do not miters because again, if you have to replace a pane of glass the butt joint will be a lot easier to pry apart with out snapping a piece then if you miter the corners.

I should have mentioned yesterday above that Steve recommended putting the small bead of excel pretty much around the perimeter so the the glass is supported equally all the way around. 

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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1 hour ago, Chet said:

Going back to this conversation.  Butt joints is what you want to do not miters because again, if you have to replace a pane of glass the butt joint will be a lot easier to pry apart with out snapping a piece then if you miter the corners.

I should have mentioned yesterday above that Steve recommended putting the small bead of excel pretty much around the perimeter so the the glass is supported equally all the way around. 

I have always worked under the assumption that if a piece needed to be replaced (glass) you would most likely need to replace the trim as well since it would probably get beat up in the removal anyways ... 

 

Also ... Curious once you get to the hinges and cutting them on the door and frame ... could you walk us through that part? I have never made a door and installed from scratch ... 

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26 minutes ago, Bushwacked said:

Also ... Curious once you get to the hinges and cutting them on the door and frame .

They have jigs for cutting the hinge mortise and the holes for you door knobs.  Some of them are all in one units and they aren't that expensive.  The one I had was all in one and plastic, I think it was made by Irwin.  You use your router for the hinge mortise and a hole saw set or Forstner bits for the knob set.

 

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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26 minutes ago, Bushwacked said:

I have always worked under the assumption that if a piece needed to be replaced (glass) you would most likely need to replace the trim as well since it would probably get beat up in the removal anyways ... 

 I have had decent luck with this.  Having finish on all sides of the strips really helps along with brads or pins... oh and patience.  I actually used a putty knife that I sanded a pretty pointed edge on to get between the strip and rabbet to start prying it out.

With something that has painted trim, yea if it breaks it breaks but with something nice like Coop's door having the same age and match on the wood makes trying to save the pieces a little more critical.

 

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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9 hours ago, Bushwacked said:

Also ... Curious once you get to the hinges and cutting them on the door and frame ... could you walk us through that part? I have never made a door and installed from scratch ... 

Coincidentally my brother is making a set of doors for a client and ordered the mortising jig and I get to use it. I’ll take some pics of the process. 

Because of the location and slight travel, I really don’t see much of a chance of the panes getting broken unless:

1) my feet get tangled up in my walker 

2) the wood swells or contracts too much. I will have the glass cut a tad small (again, I have 1/2” on all sides to play with) and with the flexibility of the silicone, I don’t see that being a problem either. And if the wood swells that much, I’ll have to crawl in thru the bathroom window! Reminds me of a song? 

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  • 1 month later...

Well, after 10 weeks, we finally got the building permit and the slab forming will start tomorrow. Although the door won’t be installed for a couple of months, I got the itch to start back working on it. I took it to the glass company yesterday for them to measure for the panes as it will have tempered glass, if they measure wrong, they buy it. 

Today, I mortised out for the three hinges using an inexpensive jig from Amazon. It worked great and even came with a carbide bit with bearing, all for less than $15.

AA461E7B-D1E3-4270-8E5C-ACFA990FBEA0.thumb.jpeg.d4eabbb7cac8c8f3b82e00602e5f6c8b.jpeg

 

52AF30DC-C906-448E-BEBC-CFF9D4ACD0E5.thumb.jpeg.429388da9896df48df1ebe7b8931822d.jpegThe only down side of the jig is the thickness which allows for the bearing to ride against. This didn’t allow me to use the hinge as a depth guide so I used some scrap wood and trial and error to get the correct depth. 

I cut the retaining strips with a bead on the show side. Due to the bead, I found that mitered corners looked better than butt joints. But, keeping Chet’s advice about replacement in case a pane gets broken, I made several extra pieces. Whether or not I can find them if it occurs, we’ll see. A coat of ARS on the trim pieces.

27D6A7D8-7800-42B3-B93B-11B2D1BA49C0.thumb.jpeg.9783911816d96f8e081ca7d9e3f113e0.jpegA07DC584-24A7-4338-9E42-F074D76C3AD9.thumb.jpeg.a4a32684603886cd5f4ba85c3b063f63.jpeg

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Tie your shoe laces before you trip and fall.  At least thats what my mom used to tell me all the time.

(three photos from the bottom)?

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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2 minutes ago, Chet said:

Tie your shoe laces before you trip and fall.  At least thats what my mom used to tell me all the time.

(three photos from the bottom)?

Darn lucky to have shoes on at all. It was a brisk 55* and I just slipped into to them to prevent frostbite?

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