Jump to content

Recommended Posts

F3E21961-79C0-4735-A30E-B1AA438AB52E.thumb.jpeg.90f8d8b3cb302d95b41ef9a9c0537eb0.jpegPer Paul Sellers and others, a double mortise and tenon is end to end and a twin m&t is side by side so perhaps I have been using the wrong terminology? 

Anyway, I cut all parts to length and width and down to final thickness and laid them out on a piece of sacrificial mdf. It’s hard to tell from the pic but the bottom rail is 8” wide and according to some, that’s correct. The top and stiles are 5” and inside rails are 3”. Laid out, it looks too much like an exterior door with the bottom rail that wide. On a forum someone mentioned that a bottom rail doesn’t know it’s a bottom rail. If I continue with the 8” bottom, I will use two each, double (as defined above) m&t’s. For aesthetics, I’m thinking of cutting the bottom rail down to 5” and use one m&t. As usual, I’m probably over thinking the whole darn thing. Anyone see a reason not to go with a 5” bottom rail? 

Edited by Coop
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 227
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I got this today from Whiteside for the mortises. That one mean looking bit! 

Well, after 10 weeks, we finally got the building permit and the slab forming will start tomorrow. Although the door won’t be installed for a couple of months, I got the itch to start back working on

I sure need no frost until about Christmas in order to get the tomatoes safely into canning and on blt’s. Got the first coat of ARS on one side of the door today. Also got the holes drilled for the ha

Posted Images

Jamie, I think that is the consensus for an exterior door. As this will go from our bedroom to the bathroom. My wife wears flip flops and me barefoot so no a concern. I see where you are going with this and appreciate ya. I’m more thinking of the proportions with regards to stability.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the wider bottom as well.  I think it gives the heavier look at the bottom and a lighter look on top.  As for the M&T, if I were using the domino, I'd probably do 3 on each side of that rail.  If I were doing traditional M&T, I would either do 2 or 1 jumbo..  I just don't know that there's a wrong answer.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Kev said:

I like the wider bottom as well.  I think it gives the heavier look at the bottom and a lighter look on top.  As for the M&T, if I were using the domino, I'd probably do 3 on each side of that rail.  If I were doing traditional M&T, I would either do 2 or 1 jumbo..  I just don't know that there's a wrong answer.

From what I’ve read, 8” is the magic number for double m&t’s but have never seen what to leave outside and inside the tenons so I picked 1/2” . So 1/2” in from the end, 3 1/4” wide tenon, 1/2” original stock, 3 1/4” tenon and 1/2” original stock,  Hopefully that makes sense. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Coop said:

From what I’ve read, 8” is the magic number for double m&t’s but have never seen what to leave outside and inside the tenons so I picked 1/2” . So 1/2” in from the end, 3 1/4” wide tenon, 1/2” original stock, 3 1/4” tenon and 1/2” original stock,  Hopefully that makes sense. 

Yep..  And it should be just fine..

Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I will add is from what I see that is some really nice straight tight grain.  Perfect for a door and it looks like it has some nice and differing color to it, that should look really nice when all finished.

  • Like 3

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am good with the thicker bottom ... for the most part your eyes wont see it, I think?  I would assume your eyes would see the smaller inner pieces and then the 5" top and trick your mind into thinking the bottom is the same? 

 

Either way, thats some great looking wood there though! Will look amazing!! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I became way more familiar with a plunge router today than I ever imagined. 28 mortises, 1 1/2” deep. Kev, the plunging the ends first is a good idea. Due to the depth, I went 3/4” , did the length and repeated. Even though I used stop blocks with double back tape, I think the initial plunges helped clear the chips. Although I won’t know until tomorrow after cutting some tenons if everything lines up, the double edge guide was well worth the money.

63F956D2-9757-4C9F-8B5F-41B745484E41.thumb.jpeg.9e980365fad6848d1ea3f5b082151b27.jpeg7ADD8276-34C8-40C1-B046-DF4DCC4C9BB7.thumb.jpeg.b70a33d9c37444076fe7dbdb30feab75.jpeg68EE346B-5F4A-4D90-B239-CE9DE16207C4.thumb.jpeg.4f390826f30f267dfd74d3d4a8fe77bc.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bushwacked said:

Either way, thats some great looking wood there though! Will look amazing!! 

Although I’m sure I’ve told the story more than once, I cut the walnut tree down about six years ago in Louisiana and brought it back to Houston and had it milled and it has been air drying ever since. It’s humble beginnings.

03FE367D-BD23-46BF-9DA2-7055C4494C17.thumb.jpeg.acc0c2f3b1a88c178519643513948271.jpeg21CB5DA7-AE66-4565-A7B8-E13CB8B1C96F.thumb.jpeg.dc11ce0f615198437860cf17007383ed.jpeg15924D63-B294-4F44-B234-8AE0D28832F6.thumb.jpeg.2a008ec9fd02e1e70e97cdad3bfcc33a.jpeg85D6BAD2-922F-4E41-9369-C6EC0EB14393.thumb.jpeg.7a05fa522b2aea537ab5f108f2f25d25.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t know if it’s Kosher but whatever hardwood I had laying around for the tenons.  A combination of cherry, walnut and hard maple. Hopefully, I didn’t have to use the same species, walnut. As it has only been dry fitted, if that’s the case, please let me know. Speaking of dry fit, to my amazement, after dry fitting,  only a little sanding with 150 thru 220 will be needed. I did mess up on one of the mortises and cut it not quiet long enough and had to haunch tenon one half of one. Just tickled the hell out of me! I’ve been toying with the idea of how to sandwich the glass and have decided to use the same beaded board that I used on my recent build of an end table on the outside edges of the drawers. If anyone has a better idea, PLEASE let me know. As my final glue up using epoxy will be outdoors due to the size of this mother, maybe this coming weekend. 

6EAB80D6-F292-4F70-B23E-3B149BBDE967.thumb.jpeg.43188f0b7733f35d4afe1740664ef348.jpegE7C2E003-942E-43DE-BB72-C9B0C2810E48.thumb.jpeg.cab030583304b23ca04fcf8e5ac5fc5b.jpeg

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Woodenskye (Bryan) said:

Don't think the species of tenon would matter, good place to use small scraps up.

I agree but like Kev said search out for the straight grain.  I think the ones from Festool are beech.

  • Like 1

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Woodenskye (Bryan) said:

Before final glue up you could cut a rabbet for the glass to fit in then you could use a small molding to secure. How close to center would determine depth of rabbet. 

When I did my back porch screen door I glued it all up then ran a bearing guided rabbeting bit around the back side of the opening. Then I just squared up with a chisel. To me that was easier than doing a bunch of stopped rabbet. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kev said:

My only suggestions on the tenons, and I don't know that it really matters, is to try in stay in the same species or pick stable straight grain hardwood.  

I agree with Bryan on fitting the glass..

The walnut tenons are from the same wood as the door and the maple is pretty straight. The cherry could probably be called curly and might be a good idea to remake them and in doing so, I can replace the maple ones as well. Is using the same species recommended as different woods have different movement habits? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Coop said:

The walnut tenons are from the same wood as the door and the maple is pretty straight. The cherry could probably be called curly and might be a good idea to remake them and in doing so, I can replace the maple ones as well. Is using the same species recommended as different woods have different movement habits? 

Different movement properties, yes.  Noticeable on such small pieces, I highly doubt it.  I wouldn't worry about is on this project, just a tid bit for the back of the brain on future projects.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...