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  1. Well, she's as done as she's going to get! I've got help coming tomorrow afternoon to help get it in the house..lol. I'll install the top once it's in the house. It was all I could do to lift one end to get it up on the blocks for finishing.
    8 points
  2. Final check with glass and rounded corners .. got my figure 8s figured out wiped down with mineral spirits and ready for finish tomorrow.
    7 points
  3. Started off rough milling and gonna let it sit a day or 2 before final milling. nothing super cool to look at haha. But the project has kicked off!
    7 points
  4. Sorry for not being around much lately. Took a little family trip and have been playing catch up since. We went to Rocky Mountain national park to take in the sites. Was a great time! Only work that I’ve gotten done on the cabinets is getting all the doors and face frames finish sanded. Took quite a bit of time to get through them all. I believe it was right around 7 hours of sanding time. This photo was taken after about 2 solid hours of sanding, the cart on the left was the progress. Will start staining as soon as I get the 1/4” ply skins cut and sanded.
    7 points
  5. Well, the final video is currently pushing to YT. As it will take several hours, I'll update the private viewing in the morning to include all the videos. There will be 6 videos in total and close to 3 hours of finished video. In the meantime, here's the nightstands in the room with the bed!
    7 points
  6. As you all know, I lost my dad and my brother late last year. My brother asked that all of his ashes be spread in Hawaii but, my sister and I needed urns for my dad. I had a really nice piece of spalted maple that I had been saving for a special project and some of that really nice walnut from Tennessee - Thanks @Spanky- They always go great together. Thanks to @Chet for the beautiful remembrance plates for the front of each one! I did not film this build but, will answer any questions you might have.
    7 points
  7. I will store my new branding iron in one of my tool drawers but it seems like an item the could get banged or nicked up so today I built a box out of some leftover poplar I had. I used box joints and a sliding top. When I cut the top, I screwed up my measurement by and inch and because I was using scraps for the project I didn't have another piece that would work so I added a piece of wenge on the end as a pull. I did a couple of coats of blonde de-waxed shellac that I had a small amount of left in the jar. The wenge is rounded on the end, then I coved the top with a rasp and rounded the bottom also with the rasp. Kind of hard to see on th dark wood.
    7 points
  8. So now that the mortiser is back up an running. I carved out a few hours tonite to get started on the frame work. I really don’t have much of a sketch on this one. I’ve been back a forth on the design on this one. It started out as a dovetailed case but I didn’t like it once I got started on it so I scrapped that design. It is having to fit in a very exact place of dead space behind back door. It just happens to be just deep enough for books. The ends will be frame an panel into 1 1/2” legs. Will have to long rails along the front with matching rails along the back. These will support the shelves. So I created a story stick of all the mortise location for the rails a side panels. I laid out one leg off of the story stick then transferred it to the matching leg. The front rail have a deep mortise about 1 1/16” deep I draw bore into the leg. On the back legs I set the rails in a good bit. That ended up causing my two mortises to cross. I notched the tenon so they can cross each other inside the leg.
    7 points
  9. Well the kitchen was officially finished at 6:30 pm last night. It took 51 days and mostly with out surprises but there were a couple of things that added to the excitement. One was some water damage around the sink and dishwasher but I was expecting this as we had some dishwasher problems about three years ago and this required some subfloor replacement. The other was when the counter tops were installed I had to move the plumbing around under the sink to line up with the new drain locations and the way the new garbage disposal installed. This was no big deal, I just don't like plumbing. Just because I am at the age where I just don't want to work on my hands and knees any more I hired a neighbor thats a floor installer to do the floor. This served two purposes, I didn't want to do it and he hasn't had much work during the pandemic. The guy did top notch work, even the edges against the wall that were going to be covered by base board were straight as an arrow. The other thing that we farmed out was the counter tops, just not an amateur type project for the product that we selected. Everything else we did ourselves. We went with painted cabinets, I did a review of the product that we used in the Shop Tools and Reviews forum. I made all new doors and drawer fronts, Shaker Style with Blum hinges and then in the peninsula I opened up the back side to get better use of the space and made and installed sliding doors, Hinged doors wouldn't work because of they're location. These first four pictures, with me standing in the same location to take them are before and after. Before After Before After The counter tops are DuPont Corian, it is an impermeable product so it doesn't stain or hold any kind of bacteria, mold or residue. It is a product that is approved for commercial food services. One of the cool features is if you select one of their sinks, when it is installed it is part of the counter, there is no seams or lip to gather gunk. We paid extra for a higher back splash and the paid extra for the coved back splash. You can't see any of the seams in the counter. The section with the sink they brought in, in two pieces, I watched them do the work and I still can't see without really analyzing it were the seam is. The sink and a view of the coved back splash. The new opening and doors on the peninsula. And the finished drawer bank. The first picture in this thread was the day I was installing metal slides to replace the wood I had originally done.
    7 points
  10. So, this was just not going to be a YouTube project as it was quite a struggle to get through. Lots of deep thoughts and memories as I went through the build. I didn't stray too far from my comfort zone as my brain just wasn't on the build for this one. The material is walnut from @Spanky and red gum that I sourced locally. My dad's wife was pretty particular on the size to fit a specific location that she wanted it. I'm ultimately not a fan of the dimensions as it just looks too square. But, in the end, this was the request so, I did the best I could.
    7 points
  11. I am not a Star Trek fan but couldn't resist a reference to a very early episode of the TV show. (The Trouble with Tribbles) I took the opportunity to really clean out my scrap bin. Most of the pieces I used for these were to small to do bigger things like cutting boards. I ended up making 12 and they are mostly around 9 inches square but vary and they are just over 3/4 inches thick. I just finished them with one coat of Mineral Oil. They could be used as trivets or even cheese boards. I don't usually mass produce Christmas presents but that is what they may end up getting used for. But I have a nurse that lives a cross the street and given the efforts here recently that nurses and doctors and other caregivers have been putting in, I have been thinking about just taking them to her when the dust settles and telling her to share them with her co-workers as a meager form of thanks.
    7 points
  12. Thanks guys!! yes I went with a film topping as it had a cool pattern however it was put on only with water and static?? I’m not sure how well it will hold up. I wouldn’t recommend the film on it either and I won’t use it again. It was easy to install and everything I just don’t think it is going to last long and not bubble. A couple other pics… it was super hard to get the texture from the film in picture
    6 points
  13. Sorry got a little busy with sport seasons kicking off … we got 2 soccers, a baseball and a softball season haha. We kinda busy. I will take a few better pics tomorrow when I get some free time. Here is a quick and dirty one though.
    6 points
  14. Well, after spending $70 per gallon for two gallons of Benjamin Moore paint, $45 for primer and $80 for glaze and tint, I believe I could have made this from cherry and I would have been more satisfied but not what the “doctor ordered”. It’s functional and what she wanted but most of all, it’s finished and it’s out of my shop. And yes, priorities are in the correct order this time! 😀 i really like the Blum undermount soft close glides and the Blum European self closing hinges.
    6 points
  15. On to door assembly......start out by hand sanding the mill marks on the raised panels. Not a fun process to do and only way I’ve found is to do it by hand. I can’t seem to find my hand sanding pad, I believe an 8 year old was last seen using it. I just use a piece of sticky back paper folded in half to do this set. Get a little hot to hold at times. I decided to pre stain the door edges. Have never done this step before but after talking to my buddy at the cabinet shop they have switched to this method after having some door panels shrink and it leaving a line of unstained material. With as dark of stain that is going on these cabinets I thought it might not hurt. Only staining the fronts. I did manage to find a space ball alternative, found some weather striping that is 1/4 wide by 1/8 thick. Just cut it down to 1”-1 1/2” pieces. It is a little tricky being that it’s sticky on both sides. Found using a small flat head screwdriver helps seat it. One advantage to it being sticky is that it doesn’t fall out once it’s in place. First door went together fairly easily. I always leave the rails stick off the end of the stile to allow me to tap them flush. It is a lot easier to tap them flush than to try to tap them back out. Just not much to make contact with the hammer. Once they are flush I give them a light squeeze with the clamps and check for square. I did have to adjust every door just a hair to get them spot on. And here is my progress for the night. Takes quite a bit of time to go through all the steps. Doing them in small batches to break up the hand sanding. I decided against putting a pin nail in the back rail and just letting them cure in the clamps. Figured that by time the next batch is ready the glue will be set long enough.
    6 points
  16. Here's a final pic of the bed with a quilt that my wife made..
    6 points
  17. Next thing I did was get the top on and trimmed it out with some shop made molding and added a banding detail around the case at the base and below the top drawer. There is one other detail I am adding. I am doing a faux through tenon with a pyramid design on top on the from two legs. I removed most of the waste with a forstner bit. Then I clamped my template and routed out the rest. Then leaving the template in place, I cleaned up the corners with a chisel. and it left me with this on the two front corners. By this time in the day I didn't feel like tackling the pyramids so I finished the day by spending an hour and a half hand sanding all the details on one of the nightstands... fun stuff,🙄 Shoptalk Live podcast helped it go a little better.
    6 points
  18. No it is pretty simple, you only have to mark out the mortise on piece if all you pieces are the same thickness like these web frames. If it is something like a leg and apron then you need to mark out on leg and one apron. You need one witness mark for the center of you mortise's width and the center of the mortises length. On the rail its on the end it looks like this. On the stile its on the side and looks like this. Then you clamp it in the mortiser, lining up the witness mark for the length of you mortise with the centerline on the mortiser itself. Then I have a piece that fits perfectly in the slot of the mortiser that has a centering line on it. Using this you adjust the top of the mortiser until the line lines up with the centerline on your piece of work for for the center of your mortises width. After you are setup like this all your other pieces just need a witness mark for the center of the mortise's length. You line it up un the center line of the mortiser, clamp it and go. Nothing else changes. In my thread about building this in the tips and techniques section I posted Morley's video and he probably explains it better.
    6 points
  19. Had some time today and got all the mortises done for the aprons, 32 in all. After that I used up some scraps to make the loose tenon stock.
    6 points
  20. After gluing up the leg blanks I cut some veneer to glue over the glue lines on the leg blanks. You can see the veneer on the top and bottom on this end view of the leg. Doing this gives you nice grain on all four sides of your leg and saves you having to buy thicker stock to make you legs from. After this I made up a jig to cut the dados in the legs for the web frames using the router. Squared up the dados with some chisels. Next up is the web frames.
    6 points
  21. Did a quick little cabinet stand for the drill press and mortiser over the weekend. Took just over a sheet of 3/4 acx ply and used a few hardware parts I had laying around in the shop. Goal was to make a home for the mortiser and get it off my shaper. That has been its home for the past couple months since I got it. Also to get the drill bit storage next to the drill press. Which in turn frees up a drawer in the outfeed table to make room for table saw blades and accessories. The cart I am replacing was a $1 auction find that has more than earned it’s keep. Just didn’t look very good, it help my spindle sander and drill press since my old shop. It’s a two sided cart with a couple drawers on the drill press side and one drawer on the mortiser side. The door opening holds my tenon cutting sled and spacers . Did find a parts try that I had in a cabinet that I cut down to fit in one of the drill press drawers that holds quite a few of my mixture of drill bits. Didn’t get a picture of it but can if anyone is interested in seeing it. Did not bolt down either tool yet as I am waiting to see if they need to be positioned differently.
    6 points
  22. Actually this would work on any size box if you wanted. I have also heard this referred to grain wrapping. First thing what I show here I learned while taking a class of Matt Kenney's, so the credit goes to him. You start out with you stock mill on both faces and both edges and you also want to true up the two ends. You don't want to do that down the road. You want to start with a perfect stick of wood. I mark mine up a lot to keep things straight. I put an "A" on one end, both sides and a "B" on the other end both sides. I also make "Fence Side" on one side and "Outside" on the other just because. Then I put one triangle on one edge and two on the other edge. Kind of towards the center. Then simple re-saw them. After running the through the planer or drum sander to clean them up, open then like a book at the ends. It doesn't matter which end in fact you want to try both to see which way gives you the grain pattern you want. With them laying open like this the inside faces will be the out side faces of the box. You want you lay out to look like this. Red lines being one piece and Blue lines being the other, you want to alternate you long and short pieces. You want you waste to be at opposite ends. Number 1 thru 8 on both sides of you cut lines. This will help you realign them after you cut and miter the pieces. Next you set the stop on you miter fence to whatever you long pieces are going to be. You will also need a scrap block of wood that is equal to the difference of you short pieces and long pieces. As an example, if you long ones are 12 inches and you short ones 7 inches you need you block to be 5 inches. For no particular reason I started my cuts on the blue board first, so I put the block against the stop and made the short cut. Then removed the block and make the cut for the long piece. Next I cut the long piece on the red board, put the block back and cut the short piece. I have a sled built just for cutting 45's like you need for boxes. It includes a stop block and a plexiglass strip over the business end, it helps keep your digits away from the blade, but I can still see my work. I take one of the long pieces and with the out side face, facing up, I line the top end with the very edge of the fence right were the 45 angle is. Once this is lined up, hold it there and move the stop block inplace at the opposite end. I did remember to lower the blade some before I started my cuts. The set up looks like this. Make the cut, turn it end for end and cut the other miter. Then do the second long piece. Put the scrap block you used with the miter gauge next to the stop block on he sled and cut you short pieces the same as the long ones above. The beauty of the scrap block is you don't have to make any changes to the setup of you miter gauge or sled to make any of your cuts. After everything is cut just reorient the piece according to numbers you marked on each side of you cut lines during lay out. Using blue tape, tape the seams from top to bottom. After they are all taped, turn it over carefully so the miters are facing up and apply glue to all the miter areas. You don't need to get crazy with the glue it's just a small box that isn't going to be under a lot of stress. Then just fold the corners all the way around and tape the last corner making sure it is aligned properly and pull the tape tight as you hold the corner in place. You should end up with four corners that look like this. I ended up with a bit of a gap at the bottom of this corner. This was the corner that I taped last and didn't pay full attention.
    6 points
  23. I always find this amusing as well. I mean do people really think that when I was 25 with 3 kids under 3 I could really afford Festool, Lie Nielsen, etc heck no but I still made a lot of things. Having said that i'm not 25 anymore have my shop pretty much where I want it and if I want to buy $500 router or plane, well I do and I for one don't feel a bit guilty about it ?
    6 points
  24. After the glue dried on the box, I started the gluing in the dividers. First I had to cut them to the final height, and don't you know, I didn't double check my fence and cut the first one to short. A little glue and tape and all is good. After I got the goof out of the way, I got back to getting the dividers in. After that was finished up I started laying out the small box parts. On these the grain will line up across the front, the two outside sides and across the back of the three small boxes. I cut the box fronts and backs to size using relative dimensioning because the center box was about a fat 1/32 of an inch wider then the other two. But the process is the same as the big box. After those were glued up I cut the lids to size. Then chamfered the lids and boxes back at the router table. This is where we are right now. I need to come up with a design for the lid handles next.
    6 points
  25. My Christmas present to me. Its not here yet, but I Grizzly tells me I should be able to pick it up next week.
    6 points
  26. “Santa” changed his mind and I was on the hook for a desk ASAP. So that’s why there isn’t too many pics. I’ll get a pic of the final tomorrow when I get it installed in her room.
    6 points
  27. Just cleaning up the last bit of scrap in the shop.. All maple and walnut. Amazing the color differences in both species!
    6 points
  28. Thanks Kev! Looking forward to participating! I have been working on Kev's outfeed table using his plans. I'll post some pics as I move along. I recognize a lot of the names here from WTO. I used lurk in the shadows and post there every once and while. Learned a lot over there. I switched over to the FB group since it was a bit easier to navigate. Here is a project I finished about 3 weeks ago. I try and do one shop project for every 3 "honey do" projects and the out feed table is a long over do project! Thanks!
    6 points
  29. Last minute gift for someone on our list we missed.. A little different than my normal design.. Sapele and Cherry, it's what I had in the shop..
    6 points
  30. Had to crank out a couple quick gifts.. Thought I'd try something new with one and stick to what I know with the other..
    6 points
  31. I got a wild hair to try out a mitre thru dovetail. This cherry was a left over from the tv console I built last year. It’s some very pretty wood. Problem is I remember this being awful chippy an this time it proved the same. So my dovetails did not turn out as clean as I had hoped. I left all the lay out lines on this one. I go back an forth on if I like the joinery line left shown or the clean look all smoothed over. The miter was not that much more difficult. Now I will say that when fitting the joint experience does help a lot. When testing the joint knowing where you need to take material is crucial. The smallest amount in the wrong area creates a big gap somewhere else. To be honest the carved finger catch was the most stressful part.
    6 points
  32. So in the process of the kitchen renovation there are some things that need to be severely upgraded. First on the list was this bank of drawers. Twenty three years ago when I originally built the cabinets I wanted to build something that would last but the whole project was on a budget that was driven by kids in college and things like that, so there were things that needed to be skipped. One of those was drawer glides. So at the time I did the wooden drawer slide that ran down the middle of the under side of the drawer. Now I am adding mechanical slides. And it turned out to be a bit of a chore. I had to build out from the inside of the cabinet to get the drawer slides flush with the inside edge of the face frame and the left side was different then the right. To make things more fun I had to do all the work while reaching through the individual openings of the face frame. Took about 6.5 hours but this was probably the hardest of all the changes and upgrades taking place. I am glad it's done.
    6 points
  33. That's so this forum could be the first to say "Houston, we have a problem"...
    6 points
  34. Had to bore you guys one more time for a while. 2 coats of ARS and four coats of GF, HP satin. I picked up the glass yesterday and had to get a sneak view of how it will look. Next post will be in about 6 weeks, hopefully, when it is installed.
    6 points
  35. Dropping this week's video for you guys a little early.. Good to fall asleep to while you're in a food coma!
    6 points
  36. Think I figured out what I wanted for at least one of the side middle cabinets ... Should hold my Milwaukee drill and its attachments, 6 containers, mainly for screws and then a row of sandpaper boxes. Also, added another shelf in the upper cabinets to help out with storage. Doors will be coming sometime soonish I hope. I think after my coffee table build I will wrap those up. Also, all the doors are now inset, just need pulls on them too. Fancy door stops ?
    6 points
  37. I sure need no frost until about Christmas in order to get the tomatoes safely into canning and on blt’s. Got the first coat of ARS on one side of the door today. Also got the holes drilled for the hardware. I made a jig for the mortise for the whatever you call it. Worked out great. Measured a dozen times and cut and routed once.
    6 points
  38. Well, after 10 weeks, we finally got the building permit and the slab forming will start tomorrow. Although the door won’t be installed for a couple of months, I got the itch to start back working on it. I took it to the glass company yesterday for them to measure for the panes as it will have tempered glass, if they measure wrong, they buy it. Today, I mortised out for the three hinges using an inexpensive jig from Amazon. It worked great and even came with a carbide bit with bearing, all for less than $15. The only down side of the jig is the thickness which allows for the bearing to ride against. This didn’t allow me to use the hinge as a depth guide so I used some scrap wood and trial and error to get the correct depth. I cut the retaining strips with a bead on the show side. Due to the bead, I found that mitered corners looked better than butt joints. But, keeping Chet’s advice about replacement in case a pane gets broken, I made several extra pieces. Whether or not I can find them if it occurs, we’ll see. A coat of ARS on the trim pieces.
    6 points
  39. @Chet Grabbing another break...lol
    6 points
  40. Drawer boxes complete! Time for some drawer fronts! The Blum hardware allowed me to get away with 5/8" material on the drawer boxes. I like this much better than the 1/2"! Although, I did fill the DC bin 4 times milling these drawer boxes..
    6 points
  41. Calling it a day! Working each drawer one at a time to get a good fit and size.. I should do a huge milling session to get the drawer material to final thickness but, I'm doing each one individually. From installing the glides to final fit and install is taking me about 2 hours a drawer. I'm sure I'll cut that time down as I move along. 3 in, 17 to go...lol
    6 points
  42. So after completing my workbench and using it I decided I needed a moxon vise or something to raise certain work up higher. I can’t justify the hardware for a moxon at this time. So I looked around the lumber rack and scrap bin and came up with the following. The Benchtop Bench is 17 1/2” wide and 12 1/4” deep. The top is 3 1/4” thick. With the I beam supports, the total height of the bench is 7”. I didn’t glue the I beams because if I need to shorten after using I can. I used this afternoon to practice cutting dovetails, I’m really happy with it, the dovetails, not so much.
    6 points
  43. I did something like that a couple of years ago. Bending over to do detail work started giving me back pains, added to what I already had. I later screwed and glued a piece to the front leg, so instead of clamping it to the bench, it slips into the shoulder vise.
    6 points
  44. So I had a good day in the shop today. I got the top rails dovetailed into the legs. The fit isn’t great I don’t know what happened guess I got off my line some. It will still do its job an never be seen. I got the end panels rabbeted an fit into the frame. If I did this right it should equal 1/8” revel all around the frame. Never done it this way. I fitted it a touch looser than normally would a clear coated panel since this will be painted. I’ll paint it before the glue up I may I have to trim it some more we shall see. After that I got started on the sliding dovetails spacer between the rails the shelves will sit on. I tried to do a lil pictorial on it. Since I had total of 8 to do I got pics of different times during the process. I kept forgetting to take photos on the same joint. This is just the female portion of the joint. First I did a mock up male end to determine the length of the tail 2/3 the thickness of the material is a good general rule. I’m doing a 1:6 ratio tail. I laid it out cut it an that gave me the base measurement. I copied it with a pair of dividers. I laid both rails clamped together with a centerline across them. Eye balled center an made a mark. Place square across them them an knife in a line heavily. Mark the slope down both sides an make a knife wall for the saw to track in a make the cut. This is where i wish I had my new saw for this cut. Following the angle isn’t that hard no different than cutting thru dovetails. I put a single saw cut thru the center of the joint to help with chips flying out. If you don’t the chips seem to get wedged the deeper you go without the center cut. To help with blow out on the back side I take a chisel an gently chamfer it down to the base line before going after the rest. If you have never gone cross grain with a chisel the waste goes very fast bevel up so pay attention damhikt Once it’s down to 1/16 or so from the base line I switch to the router plane and smooth an level it all out. There you have matching sliding dovetails in both rails. I’ll cut the tails sometime this week an put this thing together.
    6 points
  45. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I took a trip to Northern California with my youngest daughter and her family. Our may objective was visit Mt Lassen National Park and a State Park called Burney Falls. We stayed in an AirBnB home in the town of Redding which was about an hour from each park. First time using a AirBnB home but after this experience I think any time we stay in one spot for any length of time we will do this again. It was less then have the price of a hotel per night and you have the place to yourself and a full kitchen if you want to save money eating out. Redding has a glass foot bridge that goes across the Sacramento River that is 710 feet long but the unique feature of the bridge is the tower that holds the suspension cables is a working sundial. This is the tower. Here you can see the white arc of hour markers. Close up of the Noon marker. Burney Falls is a small state park with camping and a lake but the main attraction is this water fall. The two large flows of water you see come from a river above but all of the water you see come out of the rock face is fed by hundreds of under ground springs and flows like this constantly year around. The big physical adventure of the trip was hiking to the summit of Mt. Lassen. It last erupted in 1915 and is still considered active. The trail head starts at 8500 feet in elevation and the summit is 10,476 and the trail is 2 1/2 miles to the summit, so you gain almost 2000 feet in 2 1/2 miles which is a pretty aggressive hike. In this picture you can see the summit on the right and the last set of switchbacks on the left. The switchbacks top out on the summit ridge and leave you with a little more than a quarter of a mile to the summit. This is about 200 yards from the summit. My wife and I having been to the summit about ten years ago and have the pictures to prove it, stopped here and the rest of the group went on to the summit. Were I am standing taking this picture is pretty much the rim of the volcano. Mt Lassen is what they call a plug volcano. In the foreground is the rim that I am standing on and on the other side of the snow is is the plug. After an eruption a plug of molten rock starts to push up and seal the crater. They say that this happens so slow that you could stand there and watch with out being harmed... I'm just going to take their word on it. We took our masks off for a group picture close to the summit. Actually we only wore them when passing folks on the trail. Thats me in the back with my head cut off then left to right my Grandson's girl friend, My youngest daughter, my grand daughter, my wife and my grandson. Missing from the picture is my son-in-law who tweaked his back moving an ice chest in the their Jeep the night before, so he stayed behind. I did learn one thing, I have been to a lot of summits but at 68 I think this sort of hard core hiking is behind me this one was a chore for the grand parents of the crowd but glad we did it with the youngsters.
    6 points
  46. Well, I jumped in and helped my wife start to get things organized.. Still a lot more to do! Looks like she'll need 2 more of the bigger boxes which will probably be located below the smaller boxes. She's also let me know that the gap between the boxes, she'd like some narrow boxes for smaller foldable scraps.. I'll probably build until the scrap pile is completely gone and then she'll have to wait until I get that next great deal...lol
    6 points
  47. I've been severely slacking with updates on this one...lol. It's done...lol
    6 points
  48. I got this today from Whiteside for the mortises. That one mean looking bit!
    6 points
  49. I'm 77 years old physically, but my mind is still as sharp as a 40 year old. My mind refuses to accept what it see's in the mirror. However... I had three back surgeries a little over a year ago and was told by the Doctor, I'd be up and at'em in less than a month. He lied. I now have no choice but to use a third leg to be sure I don't fall on my butt. I hate it. However I discovered that the third leg/canes they sell at drug stores and Walmart, are designed for the "average" person. I'm 6'2", a bit above the average. The store bought canes force me into a leaning position, that's quite uncomfortable on the back. So, I made one from a Dogwood branch and a chunk of Cherry. A bit taller. Still leaning over #1 into the woodstove. #2 Better, made from an Apple branch and another chunk of Cherry. Still not quite what I need, but close. Remember that 40 year old mind I told you about? It came up with an idea to rummage through my scrap/off cut collection, and I wound up with enough to construct about 10 canes. So I did, I copied a handle from my store bought one, and another I saw in a store. and this is the result. The handles are attached to the shaft with a 3/8" threaded rod , epoxied in place. There's a mix of Walnut, Butternut, Sassafras, Cherry and Maple in almost every configuration, but I think the turned out kinda nice. I kept one made from Curly Maple on the handle and Ambrosia Maple on the shaft. Comments are welcome. The one I kept has Ambrosia on the shaft in pic #5 and the handle is pic #6
    6 points
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