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  1. There isn't enough room in the shop so I moved it out in front of the garage to be able to get a decent picture of the finished product. The headboard should go faster because I think I have worked out most of the kinks in the process. Like I mentioned before a lot of the parts for the headboard were done at the same time as the footboard because of using the same set ups for both. The only part that still need to be made was the top panel. The panel had a curve at the top and again because of the space in my shop I couldn't use the bandsaw for the cut so I used my jigsaw. I cleaned up the edge with a spoke shave. At this point I was like a horse headed for the barn and ceased to remember to take any pictures, but basically the only other thing I did before starting all the glue ups was to cut a rabbet along the bottom of the curved top panel and the top edge of the top rail to glue the two pieces together. The rest of the glue up was the same as the footboard. Completed headboard. My intention was to have the top panel have a recessed appearance similar the top drawer of the nightstands with the same band of molding right below it. We completely emptied to bedroom and I shampooed the carpet. Then the next day I set everything up. This picture got taken before the slats were in place. And the new mattress, which instantly made this project very expensive, arrived the next morning. The nightstands have gained a rich dark color since bringing them in the house, I can't wait until the bed is the same. This project was also an interesting milestone, with the exception of two couches and my wife's piano all the furniture in our house has now been made by me.
    4 points
  2. Small cuts. Like 32nd heavy. then sitting in the ground I found me a little metal piece randomly … looked at the pulleys… and figured that’s gotta be it … got it back in and everything is working like it should again … crazy stuff. Never figure that thing would have wiggled loose like it did. Glad I randomly found it on the ground too haha.
    3 points
  3. With the backrest and the two end sections dry, I cut the front and back rail supports and cut the tenons on them. There is also center seat seat support that had to be cut along with the tenons and holes for the seat slab screws. After another dry fit, more epoxy and clamps. i have built several of the projects offered for sale on Marc’s Woodwhisperer site and have always watched them at least once, all the way thru prior to starting them. This time, for some reason or another, I only watched the first two or three videos before starting the build. One night while waiting for the epoxy to dry on the back section, I watched the entire set of the instructional videos. Somewhere in there Matt mentions the final height of the seat of being 24” and that being that he is on the short side, it was ideal for him and that if it was too short for the builder, then lengthen the legs. I have two other bench’s on my patio and both are 26” to the seat. So after the final assembly had dried, I placed the seat slats in place and sure enough, the seat height was a tad uncomfortable. I took some scrap 8/4 mahogany that I had and cut 2” long pieces, the same size as the legs, and with some 3/8” stainless rods as dowels, using epoxy, I length the legs by 2”. I wish that I had taken a pic of the process. Anyway, leg extensions in place and seat slats attached from the bottom, I have a new bench.
    3 points
  4. Next I cut all of the back slats, softened the edges with a 1/8” round over bit on the router table and cut all of mortises to receive the Domino tenons. The dry fit came out good and tight and square. As I wanted to assemble the ends containing the front and back legs, the seat support, the bottom brace and arm rest as one assembly, glue up of the back with epoxy included the back legs dry fitted for alignment. After waiting overnight for the epoxy to set, I tapped the back legs off of the back assembly and after dry fitting one last time, I epoxied and clamped the end assemblies. The holes you see under the seat support are for the screws to attach the seat slats. Pre-drilled on the drill press with a fortsner bit to recess and accept the washer head screws, then thru drilled with a 5/16” bit. Again, after waiting over night for the epoxy to set, they came out of the clamps. I guess I should have put this under project journals instead of here?
    3 points
  5. This is what I am aiming for. I was unable to get a pic of Matt’s bench due to lack of ability, so I stole a pic of someone else’s bench that they had built. I hope I’m not violating rules somewhere. I don’t know where to give credit for this build. My bench is made from cypress as it was readily available. Matt’s was from thermal treated ash. To whittle down the time building this, I used my Domino for the back slats joinery from the upper and lower rails. This meant that the arch on the top of the top rail could not be duplicated on the bottom, at least for me. So I chose to have it perpendicular to the legs. All other jointer is mortise and tenon. First off are the back legs. Mortises are done on my dedicated mortiser. I failed to get a pic of the front legs. After these were cut, I shaped and cut the top and bottom rails of the back rest and cut the Domino mortises for them.
    3 points
  6. I had to cut a deeper mortise to provide clearance for the male portion of the hardware. I did this by placing the female piece in its mortise and tracing the slot. After I traced it I flipped the piece end for end and traced it again, this gave me the proper length for the mortise. I used the double fence with my router and a 1/4" up spiral bit. And this is the completed mortises in a mortise. After this I finished up a couple of things on the sideboards. First, I put a 3/8 dowel an inch back from the end. I did this from both sides instead of drilling one hole all the way through because the bit wasn't long enough. The reason for the dowel is I am screwing the hardware in place with 1 1/4" screws and the dowels will give the screws something a little more substantial to bit in to other then just the end grain. I start by using my dowel jig and then complete the hole after removing the jig. Glue the dowel in, flush cut it and sand it smooth. The last thing was to attach the ledge that the slates will rest on. When I did the glue up for the legs I didn't have any clamps long enough and I don't have enough of the proper length to even hook two together. So bought some good quality load straps which worked out real well. And it made cleaning up the little bit of squeeze out pretty easy. I did glue on the bottom molding for the legs before attaching the leg. This allowed me to glue it on with the leg standing on the flat surface my assembly table. This is the bottom of the leg. When the panel and leg glue up dried I did the top cap and molding on the two legs. I glued the pyramid cap on to the to of the leg, then the first molding is about an 1 1/2 strip with a cove at the top that blends it to the pyramid. After this I attached a second piece that has a chamfer on top and cove on the bottom. This is the results.
    2 points
  7. Well I actually finished this project a couple of weeks ago but haven't been keeping up with it here so this is going to be a long update. This is the hardware I am using to attach the side boards to the legs each part sets flush in a sallow mortise and attaches with screws. I'm thinking it will be easier to rout the mortises for the hardware before gluing the legs to the foot board panel section. I have been working mainly on the foot board at this time, but as with some of the other steps it seems to make sense to do the mortises in all four legs and the two side boards at the same time. So first up was prepping the side boards. After milling them flat I need to rip them to width and cut them to final length. My shop doesn't have the space to do this on any of the stationary equipment, so I am using the track saw. Cleaned up one edge and the ripped to width. After ripping the two sides I was able to pretty up both edges on the jointer. This was the set up for cutting to length. I used my shorter track along with the TSO guide rail square. made up a jig to cut the mortises along with the plunge router and a 1/2 long pattern bit. Then leaving the jig in place as a guide I cleaned up the corners with a chisel. And the fit. The legs were pretty much the same process. I do have one more step to do on the legs.
    2 points
  8. I'm taking my required one night off and trying to stay on my sleep schedule by surfing YouTube... I stumbled across this guy who has quite a few videos with some decent content.. Nothing earth shattering but, solid videos that are fairly well done.. https://www.youtube.com/c/WorkshopCompanion/videos
    2 points
  9. I didn’t see this posted… sorry if it had been but found this extremely interesting. https://youtu.be/NZDCRFi8dKY
    2 points
  10. Had to order as they are on backorder and got the 13 and not the 13 Pro. I’ll never in my lifetime know what all I’m getting or how to use it. But, by golly, I’m current.🤬
    2 points
  11. I can see that I will probably need to be instrumental in this discussion as well. 😀
    2 points
  12. Hah! Bryan is correct on both 🙂 ... Although, I have never liked all glass doors like that to begin with. Crafstman style doors are my all time favorite!
    1 point
  13. I would assume that they have updated the house to a more modern style and the front door doesn’t fit. Then again maybe Drew just wants a challenging build.
    1 point
  14. I gotta ask, why would you replace a pretty door like that?
    1 point
  15. Not necessarily. Generally will have trim at the edge of the door, so if you take the trim off you will get the actual size of the rough opening. If you went to Home Depot and were looking for a interior door, and your rough opening (stud to stud width and floor to header length) is 31”x81”, you would buy a 30”x80” door, once installed you would trim 2 sides and top with casing. The extra inch on long measurement usually requires some slope in case on an entrance/exterior door to protect from water infiltration and flooring. On an interior door, the extra inch accounts for flooring as well. Now if for some strange reason there is no trim, in your photo it has trim, measuring the door probably would work. If you measure the door that should give you a close enough idea on size. First step should be removing the trim. The reason for the door being smaller than the opening is so that you can shim, insulate and weather strip. You don’t want the door right up against the Jack or King Studs, it will bow the jamb when you screw to framing and mess with how the door sits in the frame (jamb) and affect operation.
    1 point
  16. The first thing to do is measure the opening. The door and jamb should be an inch smaller. Another thing to search is Stave core construction. Doing solid wood can obviously be done, but the grain direction is important as well as the species, want a wood that doesn’t have large swings in wood movement. If it is covered by a porch you can use a wider array of finishes. I know not specific but just things I researched when I was thinking of doing ours after the estimates we got that I mentioned in that other thread. Check out This is Carpentry, I think Gary Katz made a couple doors, he is a “finish and trim carpentry” expert.
    1 point
  17. I’m surprised you didn’t set up some elaborate computer system that recorded you in slow motion, automatically edit and upload to your social media accounts. 😀
    1 point
  18. why is this not surprising 🙂
    1 point
  19. will enjoy hearing your thoughts too ... I have a few projects coming up and would also like to try some Rubio too
    1 point
  20. I guess I’ve never seen a $26k door and I’ve never owned a home that suggested that I need one. Personally, I liked the one they took out better, although it didn’t have side doggy doors.
    1 point
  21. Plus by the time you add in the side lights as well as above the arch, I could see it getting to that number.. Full disclosure, I haven't watched the video yet..
    1 point
  22. We had a basic door priced for our house, nothing elaborate, just something you would see at a home center, but since it was a custom size due to door opening, the let’s call it $4K door was going to be $11,000. So I could see how that door is $26k.
    1 point
  23. All great looking pieces Kev! I think I would have questioned more had you turned the left side drawers 90* or even 45*. I think you got the most drawer space from the area allowed. Thanks for the tour.
    1 point
  24. First thing would be how big of a cut your taking, it sounds like it’s being bogged down. Have you tried with less down force pressure to see if it happens. Have you or are you able to check the belt tension?
    1 point
  25. The "Finish" video for the nightstands is up and available..
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. Hopefully it raises a lot of money!
    1 point
  28. Well, so much for the new bench for the new patio. As we already had two benches and I need to allow room for an outdoor cooking area, I agreed to donate it to my sister-in-laws fall festival fundraiser. They will do a silent auction on it.
    1 point
  29. I received the 150 grit today and nothing for me to do but stop what I was doing and try it out on some scrap white oak. This is probably the most aggressive sand paper/mesh that I have ever used. Obviously I don’t know about the longevity of it yet.
    1 point
  30. Bryan, I failed to mention that. In the video, Matt damned the outside perimeter of the feet and poured about a 1/16” of epoxy and I did the same. Thanks.
    1 point
  31. Great job Coop. You may want to brush some epoxy on the bottoms of the Mahogany so water doesn’t wick up from the ground.
    1 point
  32. I like the leg extensions! Great project Coop!
    1 point
  33. Nice clean work coop! Looks awesome!!
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. That's really looking sharp Coop! Note: I moved this to the journal section. Enjoying the journey!
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. The return policy of Amazon’s is amazing. I took the box of 3” paper to a UPS drop off and in 2 minutes, I was out of there. Before I got home, I had an email that said my refund had been processed.
    1 point
  38. I saw it when it first came out. Said cool. What do I do with all my granat? Got no answer from the screen, so I guess I will worry about it when I run out, in 5yrs, or so.
    1 point
  39. That's why he's IT around here 😉
    1 point
  40. It's a super slow full cure but, sounds like you should be fine..
    1 point
  41. Good reasoning, your turning into a major techie!
    1 point
  42. I still have a 7 and need to upgrade. If I wait 6 months they will then be on the iPhone 25
    1 point
  43. Hey, you're the IT guy around here!
    1 point
  44. Second build video is up and available!
    1 point
  45. I wore one of your tee shirts with the full intent of having my friend take a pic of me in front of the Festool booth and darned if I didn’t forget. I even ironed it before I left home!
    1 point
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